Academic journal article Journal of Physical Education and Sport

Influence of Different Background Music Volumes and Mobile Phone Communication on the Reaction Time of Sports Active Students

Academic journal article Journal of Physical Education and Sport

Influence of Different Background Music Volumes and Mobile Phone Communication on the Reaction Time of Sports Active Students

Article excerpt

Introduction

To optimally prepare athletes, trainers and sport researchers are attempting to find ways to influence individual factors that create an overall sports performance. The performance level is (in some sport areas) fixed on the predispositions of one particular dominant factor that represents the overall quality of the performance. In weight-lifting, the factor is strength, and in gymnastics, the factors are the level of muscle coordination, perception of time and space of the movement under relatively constant ambient conditions. There are, however, some sports that require the ability to adequately react to constantly changing conditions. In some sports, the performance is created by an interaction with different factors that must be regarded as a complex aspect. In some sport disciplines, the overall performance consists of different condition predispositions, somatic predispositions, technique levels, tactics and psychologies. One of the variables that seems to be part of all of the above-mentioned aspects and a factors in sports performance is reaction time, which is to this date being investigated by researchers, psychologists, physiologists, pharmacologists and many others who have reported on the efficiency of intervention methods that could possibly influence reaction time. This particular variable is a significant indicator that influences the movement speed, which can be used in many sport areas (start reaction during a 100-m run, reaction to an opponent's attack in karate, fencing, boxing, etc.). The significance of reaction time can be, however, found in everyday life situations (catching a falling object, stepping on the breaks in a car, or pressing breaks while riding a bicycle, etc.). During championships, we may observe athletes preparing and exercising while using headphones. Such preparation has its substantiation, and it is definitely not just for pleasure but is part of the warm-up (Eliakim, Meckel, Nemet, & Eliakim, 2007). Athletes are better concentrated on their following performance in the sport.

The influence of music on mental and physical performance has been previously analyzed by Habibzadeh (2016). It is quite common to see people in gyms using loud music as a tool to motivate themselves to maximal performance. It is also possible to find other examples of audial interferences regarded as undesirable, and physical or psychological performance can then be negatively influenced. This influence can be seen during big sport events, where athletes are exposed to loud music and sound interferences due to fans cheering (football, volleyball, ice hockey, streetball, etc.). Additionally, audial stimulus has an effect, for example, on cyclists during big events in which cyclists obtain information from their team colleagues that could disrupt their concentration. Another example of how audio load can influence overall performance is, of course, driving while listening to loud music, which could also influence reactions. The breaking distance of a car speeding up to 100 km/h is 11 m, whereas the driver response is 400 ms. However, when the reaction is 300 ms slower, the breaking distance increases to 20 meters. This distance can be critical in heavy traffic. The relationship of reaction time during driving has been studied by Consiglio, Driscoll, Witte, and Berg (2003), who tested reaction time using a driving simulator. They found that hands-free communication during driving negatively affected the reaction time. Similar findings were verified after cellular phone usage or during conversation with a passenger. Al-Darrab, Khan, and Ishrat (2009) and Haque and Washington (2014) state similar results in relation to the reaction time. The authors mention similar negative effects of both hands-held phone and hands-free device on reaction time. Applied to sport areas, these findings are important for motor racing in which a driver obtains track information from a navigator. The influence of music on reaction time was not determined to be significant in that study. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.