Academic journal article Indian Journal of Positive Psychology

Emotional Intelligence, Organizational Role Stress and Job Satisfaction: Perspectives from Indian Public and Private Sector Organizations

Academic journal article Indian Journal of Positive Psychology

Emotional Intelligence, Organizational Role Stress and Job Satisfaction: Perspectives from Indian Public and Private Sector Organizations

Article excerpt

Today's workplace is much more unpredictable in terms of work force diversity, heavy job demands, multi-tasking job roles, time constraints, frequentjob posting and transfers. This has created lot of hassles in the life of people at work causing stress, strain and impairing work life balance. From psychological inadequacy to address conflicting role demands, the stress is varied and multifaceted. Precisely, here role stress refers to the clash brought about by roles performed by an individual and their ensuing interaction with immediate environment (Pareek, 2003).

By early 1990s, there was a long tradition of research on the role of non-cognitive factors in helping people to reduce the stress factor and to succeed in both personal life and at the workplace. Many studies report the usefulness of emotional intelligence as a part of positive psychology helping people to maintain emotional health and happiness and to keep their stress under check. Currently, emotional intelligence is a very popular domain of research in psychology and it has immensely contributed to the field of applied psychology both in theory and practice. It has also been widely applied to the field of management in general and human resources development in particular (Pradhan & Mathur, 2008; Pradhan & Thingujam, 2012). One of an important outcome of professional life isjob satisfaction which is regarded as a significant factor for consideration when it comes to professional success. Ahefty amount of our affective ability predicts how well one engage and enjoy with professional dealings, and a manifestation of that phenomenon is job satisfaction. It has been found thatjob satisfaction is an important aspect for reducing turnover and increasing employee engagement (Iverson & Currivan, 2003) and is a conglomeration of different factors from income, work place environment to psychological comfort (Nezad & Bahramzade, 2013). The present study has tried to examine the possible relationships among emotional intelligence, job satisfaction and organizational role stress and provides useful information for OB and HR expert for better management oforganizations and its people.

Emotional Intelligence

Emotional intelligence (El) is more important than intellectual or technical skill for determining individual and organizational success. Goleman (1998) has argued that a high level of emotional intelligence is a combination of five "competencies" namely self-awareness, selfregulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills. While writing about leadership and emotional intelligence, Goleman (1998) has claimed that IQ and technical skills are important, but emotional intelligence is the sine qua non of leadership. Harris Collingwood (2001) called Goleman's application of El in the workplace -surely one of the breakthrough ideas of the past decade. On the other hand, Cooper and Sawaf (1997) defined it as "the ability to sense, understand and effectively apply the power and acumen of emotions as a source of human energy, information and influence".

Therefore, it can be summed up as El emerges not from the musings of rarified intellect, but from workings of the human heart. Goleman (1997) has reiterated the importance of emotional intelligence in his second book titled "Working with Emotional intelligence" as in terms of emotional competency and specified as a learned capability that results in outstanding performance at work. The first ability test developed to measure emotional intelligence was Multifactor Emotional Intelligence Scale (MEIS; Mayer, Salovey, & Caruso, 1997) and it was later modified to improve the psychometric properties. In Indian context, Pant and Prakash (2004) has tried to evaluate the first ability measure of emotional intelligence through multifactor emotional intelligence scale (MEIS; Mayer et al., 1999). Some Indianresearchers (Sibia, Misra, & Srivastava, 2004-2005; Sibia, Srivastava, & Misra, 2003) have attempted to develop the conceptualization and measurement of emotional intelligence in India; however it is perhaps too early to critically comment on such work. …

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