Academic journal article Australian Health Review

Home Enteral Nutrition: Are We Providing a Quality Service?

Academic journal article Australian Health Review

Home Enteral Nutrition: Are We Providing a Quality Service?

Article excerpt

Received 21 August 2016, accepted 13 September 2016, published online 4 November 2016

In their article 'An evaluation of current home enteral nutrition services at principal referral hospitals in New South Wales, Australia',1 Faruquie et al. surveyed home enteral nutrition (HEN) service processes in tertiary hospitals in New South Wales and compared them with best practice guidelines for clinicians.2 The results identified very large service gaps and lack of evidence-based practice in a system that has no national funding, framework or centralised monitoring system.

Health care quality has been defined in the literature to encompass the domains of safe, effective, patient-centred, timely, efficient and equitable care.3 Encompassing these domains in quality has been shown to benefit HEN patients as well as the health system by way of shorter initial hospital stays, reduced readmissions and complications and improved quality of life.2,4 However, the study of Faruquie et al.1 demonstrates inequity in access to a coordinated, multidisciplinary service, as well as financial assistance. Safe, timely and efficient care cannot be assured when care is in line with evidence-based best practice on average 61% of the time. The right to food is a basic human right and we are not providing it in a safe equitable manner to a population of people who may be disabled, debilitated or dying, causing increased burden and stress for patients, families and caregivers. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.