Academic journal article Journal of Behavioural Sciences

Sociodemographic Factors and Job Satisfaction in Female Post Graduate Trainee Gynecologists

Academic journal article Journal of Behavioural Sciences

Sociodemographic Factors and Job Satisfaction in Female Post Graduate Trainee Gynecologists

Article excerpt

Physician satisfaction at work has broader implications on oneself and relevant organizations. Job satisfaction of physicians is linked with enhanced doctor-patient relationship and higher level of medication adherence (Al-Eisa, Al-Mutar, & Al-Abduljalil, 2005). Strengthening doctors' job satisfaction can contribute to a more sustainable workplace, in terms of both individual and hospital performance (Mache, Vitzthum, Klapp, & Danzer, 2014; Platis, Reklitis, & Zimeras, 2015). Workers with increased job satisfaction tend to be healthier as compared to those who are dissatisfied with their work (Chew, Ramli, Omar, & Ismail, 2013). However job dissatisfaction of physicians is related with greater level of burnout and other psychological problems. Work diversity and relationship with colleagues had been acknowledged as enhancing elements of job satisfaction of physicians. On the other hand demographic variables such as lower socioeconomic status, long working hours, inability to manage time, and administrative burden were linked with lessened job satisfaction of physicians (Al-Eisa et al., 2005; Elwahab & Doherty, 2014).

Job satisfaction is influenced by a combination of extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Intrinsic factors include the nature of work (such as the ability to develop one's skills, sense of autonomy, success, achievement and control); whereas extrinsic factors are not directly related to work (such as, salary, relationships with colleagues) (Bagheri, Kousha, Janati, & Jafarabadi, 2012; Kumar, Ahmed, Shaikh, Hafeez, & Hafeez, 2013). There is evidence that besides autonomy and cohesion with colleagues, other factors, such as; task variety, feedback; promotional opportunities; task identity (professional status and responsibilities associated with job); working conditions; collaboration with the staff and strength of the organizational culture have also been linked with satisfaction with job. It is seen that most of the doctors working in public hospitals tend to be dissatisfied with their job (Qamar & Baloch, 2012).

Job satisfaction appears to depend on a combination of factors including; Demographics, job characteristics and organizational environment (Ali & Wajidi, 2013). According to Hezberg theory, job satisfaction is based on two basic types of needs; the need for psychological growth or motivating factors and the need to avoid pain or hygiene factors. The motivating factors constitute elements like achievement and advancement. These are positive elements that contribute towards job satisfaction. Hygiene factors such as company or organizational policies, quality of supervision, working condition, salary, relationship with peers and subordinates, status and security are negative elements that could cause dissatisfaction at work. Age, tenure in the organization, tenure present department, gender, marital status, and salary are the demographic variables which can influence job satisfaction of doctors (Samad, 2006). Thus, endorsing the significance of these factors as crucial in determining job satisfaction.

Post graduate (PG) training is considered as important for doctors in order to increase their knowledge and caliber. Due to hectic schedule of doctors they could not manage their work which creates burden for them because they have to continue their studies along with their work in hospitals. This can influence their commitment and satisfaction with their job (Kendall, Murphy, O'Neill, & Bursnall, 2000). The problem is more acute amongst female doctors because society expects from them to responsibly manage their household as well as professional roles (Hennessy, 2007; Boquiren, Hack, Beaver, & Williamson, 2015). In Pakistan, majority of the doctors were not satisfied with their jobs (Ghazali, Shah, Zaidi, & Tahir, 2007). Female doctors had significantly lower satisfaction about workload, relation with colleagues and autonomy as compared to their male counterparts (Khuwaja, Qureshi, Andrades, Fatmi, & Khuwaja, 2004). …

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