Academic journal article Child Welfare

From the Editor: Connections and Relationships throughout Life

Academic journal article Child Welfare

From the Editor: Connections and Relationships throughout Life

Article excerpt

I connect, usually through Facebook, on a regular basis with more than 40 young people with whom I had the pleasure of working during the 1980s and 1990s. I keep up with their lives, I wish them happy birthday, I celebrate their successes and mourn their losses, and sometimes, like a parent that never stops parenting, I gently chastise them when they disclose too much about their lives (or their drama) on social media. I am always moved when they thank me for something I don't even remember doing and feel terrible when I see them continuing to struggle with some of the same things that challenged them when they were in my care. I am struck, every time I connect with these "young people"-who are now between the ages of 30 and 45 years old-by how much they still crave connections to the meaningful people in their lives. All young people need connections to caring adults for a lifetime. I am glad that I am able to maintain connections with these young people through social media, and feel privileged to continue to be a part of their lives. All of our articles in this volume are about establishing and maintaining healthy connections.

Parent-Child Mother Goose (PCMG) is a community-based parentchild program that focuses on mutual sharing of songs, nursery rhymes, and stories and is the focus of our first article by authors Ling, Tibbetts, and Scharfe. Results from the study demonstrated that, as a group, mothers who attended PCMG reported overwhelmingly positive experiences in the program. The positive results of this study are encouraging, note the authors, as PCMG is relatively inexpensive and requires few materials to deliver; further implications of the findings are discussed.

Our second article provides a narrative review of theories on the child protection work with parents. This narrative review, by author Karpetis, researched the theories underpinning child protection work with parents in the latest peer-reviewed literature consisting of 85 articles.

The experiences of frontline child welfare workers explored the transfer of learning from the classroom to the caseload is the subject of the third article in this volume. Radey and Schelbe, authors of our third article, conducted in-depth interviews with 38 newly hired frontline workers and were spurred on to conduct this study by their concerns for the high annual turnover (20-50%) that reflects the challenging nature of child welfare frontline work. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.