Academic journal article The Conradian : the Journal of the Joseph Conrad Society (U.K.)

"Joseph Conrad's" Typewriter at the Canterbury Heritage Museum

Academic journal article The Conradian : the Journal of the Joseph Conrad Society (U.K.)

"Joseph Conrad's" Typewriter at the Canterbury Heritage Museum

Article excerpt

IN HIS BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH of Conrad's secretary, Lilian Mary Hallowes, David Miller claims that the "Corona typewriter" that she "used for Mr Conrad's work" and that she requested back a month after the author's death "is currently on exhibit" in the reproduction of Conrad's study at the Canterbury Heritage Museum (2006: 94). As it turns out, however, the writing-machine displayed in the museum could not have belonged to Miss Hallowes, nor did it serve to type any of Conrad's manuscripts.

In mid-July 1919, Conrad told his agent, J. B. Pinker, that Lillian Hallowes had been "commissioned to buy a new typewriter the present one having given up after 14 years' service" (CL7 449). The price of her "new machine" (CL7 463), ?16.6.0, indicates that she purchased the latest Corona 3 model released in 1919, which sold for exactly that amount ("Corona Typewriter": 14).

A comparative glance at this Corona 3 and at the typewriter held at the Canterbury Heritage Museum will reveal that they are not the same machine. Lilian Hallowes's Corona 3 had three rows of keys, whereas the typewriter at the Canterbury Heritage Museum has four; it is a Corona 4, a model first produced in America in March 1924 ("Appraisal Data," [1927]: 17) and placed on the American market in May ("Portable Typewriters," [1927]: 3), only three months before Conrad's death, in August 1924.

Lilian Hallowes could not have used this latest model, the Corona 4, during her collaboration with Conrad. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.