Academic journal article International Journal of Business and Society

Readiness to Change in the Public Sector

Academic journal article International Journal of Business and Society

Readiness to Change in the Public Sector

Article excerpt

1.INTRODUCTION

The modern industrial world, environmental instability, tight competition, technological sophistication, the development of communication trends, social change, and environmental upheaval have led management to organize institutions through a change program (Shah, 2009). The change program is a representation of the seriousness of solving the problems and challenges facing the organization (Shah, 2011). Changeefforts have become a common pratice for organizations, both public and private sectors. However, most of these efforts end in failure (Beer & Nohria, 2000). Probst&Raisch (2005) add that academics are quite pessimistic in assessing the success of change management. Failure in the implementation is not supposed to take placeif the organization has prepared members to deal with change (Armenakiset al., 1993; Armenakis& Harris, 2002; Holt, Armenakis et al., 2007). Readiness to change is a key element as it determines consequences of subsequent changes, supporting change or resistance to change (Walinga, 2008). Cynicism and resistance to change are seen as an affirmation of disagreement with the program, while support, enthusiasm, commitment, and loyalty are signals of acceptance of change (Piderit, 2000).

The foundation for readiness to change comes from Lewin's three-stage model of change-unfreezing (Smith, 2005). In general, this model allows change agents to communicate the urgency of and the need to change (Kotter, 1999). On the other hand, readiness to change requires time investment because organizations need to convey a message that contains five components: discrepancy, precision, boss support, confidence in change, and benefits (Bernerth, 2004). Abolition of the preparatory phase in change only creates the illusion of time and failure of change program (Kotter, 1995). This may occur because the perception of employees is considered less important. Often, the detailed explanation of the contents of a change program is delivered without explaining the motives and goals of the change program (Self, 2007). In fact, employee's perception becomes an important basis for building momentum (Eby, Adams et al., 2000).

Unfortunately, existing studies generally respond to staff readiness in the private sector (Armenakis et al., 1993; Armenakis& Harris, 2002; Holt et al., 2007), whereas the public sector gets less attention. This research focused on the public sectors that implement the remuneration program. We underscore that the nature of this change program is a comprehensive change in the compensation system and this policy is the initiation of the Indonesian government in the framework of bureaucratic reform. Bureaucracy reform aims to achieve decent organizational governance. This process began to develop in 2010 through the issuance of Presidential Regulation No. 81/2010 on Bureaucratic Reform. It was then followed by the issuance of Regulation of the Minister of Administrative Reform and Bureaucratic Reform (PAN and RB) Number 20 of 2010 on RoadMap of Bureaucratic Reform 20102014. To respond to the unique characteristics of remuneration programs and lack of research on the role of readiness to change in the public sector, this study examined the role of readiness to change (RTC).

Empirical research on the readiness to change inattitudetoward change (ATC) (Shah and GMlamSarwar Shah, 2010; Faghihi & Allameh, 2012), leadership style (Chen & Silverthorne, 2005; Faghihi & Allameh, 2012), as well as related variations the way a person reacts to readiness to change have been conducted, but the role of transformational leadership (TL) has never been investigated in previous studies. The style of leadership that is often considered is change-oriented leadership, which is the development of transformational leadership. Testing transformational leadership roles helps organizations to design more targeted change programs. Based on Judge, Thoresen et al. (1999), individual-oriented research on organizations has exploited leadership issues, in the form of top management roles, without considering individual trends when experiencing organizational change. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.