Academic journal article Journal of Information Ethics

Reducing the Digital Divide

Academic journal article Journal of Information Ethics

Reducing the Digital Divide

Article excerpt

The digital divide is the gap between people in access to and use of information and communication technology ("Digital divide," 2017). The explosion of technology over the past several years means that some will have access and others will not, and the former will prosper and the latter will lag behind. The ones who lack access or use and thus lag are often ethnic and racial minorities, as well as poor people, and, globally, countries racked by poverty.

So, what can we do? Here at my school, the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, we have many students from poverty backgrounds. We are a Hispanic-serving institution, and some of our students come from families that speak little or no English. These families tend to be (a) poor and (b) lacking in computers, the internet, etc. One way we help these students and all the others who attend here is to have many computers on campus that are available for use. Thus, students who do not have home access to computers can come to the university and have free access.

Also, when the students use the free computers, they tend-based on a recent study I did with two colleagues here, Jeffrey Huerta and Mark Winkel-to use them for educational purposes, as opposed to social, entertainment, or other needs. …

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