Academic journal article Journal of Band Research

Concert Band Literature on Youtube

Academic journal article Journal of Band Research

Concert Band Literature on Youtube

Article excerpt

When one makes a conscious decision to invest time in an activity, one is also choosing not to invest in others. This decision may be a gauge of what one values. An overt indicator of what one values may be the frequency one engages in the activity. In terms of music preference, time spent listening to a particular composition, learning a composition for performance, or sharing recordings of pieces with others may be indicators of value. Some variables researchers have examined in relation to music preference include amount of musical training (Geringer & McManus, 1979; Price 1988; Price & Yarbrough, 1987), repeated listening (Bradley, 1971; Hargeaves, 1984; Yarbrough & Price, 1987), and ownership of recordings (Price & Swanson, 1990; Price & Yarbrough, 1987). This study examined the latter variable tangentially. Rather than focusing on recording ownership, this study sought to examine the musical selection behaviors of uploaders and viewers of concert band literature posted on YouTube.

Since its inception in 2005, YouTube's popularity has increased on a regular basis. Internet users frequent the site often, evidenced by YouTube's standing as the third most visited site in the United States, which comprises 30% of all web traffic on YouTube. It is also the second most viewed site in the world, eclipsed only by Google (Alexa Internet, Inc., 2016). Users currently view hundreds of millions of hours of YouTube video each month. Over the last three years watch time increased 50% yearly (YouTube, 2016). A report from the Pew Research Center (2013) indicated that since 2006 adult use of sites such as YouTube increased from 33% to 72%. In a recent study, Nielson (2012) found teenagers listened to music through YouTube more than radio, iTunes, or compact discs.

When comparing undergraduate music students' use of YouTube to their use of a university library's media collection, Lai (2013) found that 85% of students accessed YouTube for educational purposes including finding recordings. Eighty-one percent searched YouTube first when preparing for lessons or rehearsals. Another study that examined undergraduate and graduate music students' information seeking behaviors showed an average of 95% of students used YouTube to identify and access sound recordings, while 72% stated they used iTunes (Dougan, 2012). Comparison of YouTube to other online search engines (e.g., Google, Yahoo, or Bing) and websites (i.e., Amazon and Wikipedia) revealed that more students searched for scores and recordings on YouTube than the other websites. Students cited the ease of access and variety of interpretations available as positive aspects of using YouTube. However, they also found the lack of control in selecting a particular group or performer to be problematic. Other issues found in music related videos posted on YouTube were the prevalence of unfit interpretational models and incorrect techniques (Marks, 2013; McCoy, 2011).

While accessibility was already identified as a positive aspect of YouTube's use, YouTube made access to videos even more convenient when they created the playlist feature. This feature allows users to create a collection of videos posted by others. The user can then view each selected video on a loop from a single page. Mercer (2011) identified one use of YouTube's playlist feature as a means for collecting videos relevant to specific topics. For example, users could create playlists of wind band compositions they value for repeated listening.

Webb (2007, 2010) suggested YouTube videos could enhance music listening and analysis within the classroom. He also advocated the use of video clips in the classroom because video viewing is a common manner in which students engage with music in their daily lives (Webb, 2010). Stowell and Dixon (2014) found music teachers incorporate YouTube into classroom activities including those involving music listening which may indicate music teachers value YouTube as a music resource. …

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