Academic journal article Journal of Research in Gender Studies

Linguistic Practices in Gendered Institutional Settings: Speech Behavior of Female Political Leaders

Academic journal article Journal of Research in Gender Studies

Linguistic Practices in Gendered Institutional Settings: Speech Behavior of Female Political Leaders

Article excerpt

1.Introduction

Women remain a fleetingly unimportant subgroup in positions of political leadership. Men take up an unbalanced proportion of the floor in public contexts. Women moving into male-dominated jobs and entities frequently embrace the manner of speaking (Lăzăroiu, 2017a, b; Mihăilă, 2018; Petcu, 2016; Popescu and Alpopi, 2017; Reimann, Pausch, and Diewald, 2017; Žurga, 2017) which is deep-rooted as the institutional standard. (Cameron and Shaw, 2016)

2.Literature Review

Organizations are gendered, and their standards, regulations, and practices may display gender imbalance. Male and female manners of speaking are not granted comparable value: women in public contexts are compelled to harmonize to male criteria (Hurd, 2016; Mihăilă, Popescu, and Nica, 2016; Nica, 2018; Popescu Ljungholm, 2017a, b, c) with the aim of being successful. Like men, women may act in fashions which are combative and notably belligerent. Women's employment of concerted and backup strategies (Balica, 2017; Leskaj, 2017; Nica, 2015; Peters, 2016; Popescu, 2018) may be the consequence of a predetermined, gender-based choice for a particular manner of speaking. Separate dissimilarities, and ones in function and status (Ionescu, 2017; Mihăilă, 2017; Nordberg, 2017; Popescu et al., 2017a, b) displaying the standpoint of a leader's political party, become more visible than gender disparities as an impact on linguistic behavior. Albeit female politicians do not use a distinct position from their male equivalents (Lăzăroiu et al., 2017; Nica et al., 2014; Petcu, 2017; Popescu, 2017), they may nonetheless be designed as inconsistent in images of their speech. (Cameron and Shaw, 2016)

3.Methodology

Using data from Pew Research Center, I performed analyses and made estimates regarding the percentage saying women/men make better political leaders, the percentage indicating major reasons why there are not more women in top executive business positions or in high political offices, and the percentage saying, in general, women/men in high political offices are better at working out compromises, being honest and ethical, working to improve quality of life for U. …

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