Academic journal article Researchers World

Maladjusted Behaviors of Pre-Adolescent Learners as Perceived by Teachers

Academic journal article Researchers World

Maladjusted Behaviors of Pre-Adolescent Learners as Perceived by Teachers

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION:

Most pupil maladjustment can be detected early when children first enter school. It is possible to describe, in some considerable detail that-, home and social situations which clearly put children's mental health at risk and one need to identify circumstances in early school life are likely to precipitate if not, cause trouble in class. Everyone knows too that disturbances become more difficult to contain or to cure as maladjusted behavior progresses (Wall, 1994). From long practical experience and from researchers over the past years, the general lines and principles of what should be done and might in fact be successful have been made clear (Lovitt, 2011). The term behavior refers to the way a person responds to a certain situation or experience. Behavior is affected by temperament, which is made up of an individual's innate and unique expectations, emotions and beliefs. Behavior can also be influenced by a range of social and environmental factors, including parenting practices, gender, and exposure to new situations, general life events and relationships with friends and siblings (Sanden, 1997). Most children learn to regulate their reactions and feelings over time in the early years through emotional connections with "significant others" and learned self-understanding. They use facial expression, voice and body language to communicate their reactions to others. If the child receives appropriate responses then an emotional connection is established, which would ensure that the child would learn and development would be enriched (Darley, 1991).

Maladjusted behavior refers to a habitual pattern of behaviors which are detrimental to the individual. It is frequent and ultimately harmful to the individual, environment, or other persons, and impedes adaptation and healthy development. Individual behaviors are maladaptive only if they occur as part of a consistent pattern. All children break the rules from time to time. It is a common characteristic of maladjusted children, that disciplinary actions are usually not effective at curtailing their negative behaviors. They continue to misbehave in spite of the threat of punishment. It seems they are unable, or unwilling, to consider the consequences of their behavior. For this reason, they require extra attention, either in the form of counseling or behavior modification (Slavin, 1997). As mentioned by Slavin (1997), behavior modification will be utilized so as not to spoil the child, for instance if the child will be provided of all her wishes. On the other hand, disciplining the child must also be limited to what he is capable of. Imposing too heavy punishment might lead the child into more complex situation psychologically.

After the family, the school environment is the most important influence in a child's life in promoting social, emotional and academic development. As children start and progress through school they are continually called upon to adapt to new expectations, and therefore a certain amount of anxiety is to be expected. However, when a particular behavior results in undue stress for the child and elicits negative reactions from others, the behavior represents a distress signal. When this occurs, a thorough analysis of what the problem behavior actually means to the individual child can lead to interventions that can change the behavior and result in a more productive adaptation for the child (Bootzin, 1991).

Pupils aging from 11 to 14 years old have almost reached the adolescent stage. It is a critical stage where various developmental tasks are expected to come out, physically, socially and emotionally. Since pupils spend most of their time in school, five days a week and eight hours a day, teachers are the significant people who could straightforwardly determine and assess the maladjusted behaviors that they observed on their pupils. They can also cite reasons behind the behavior of their pupils as they allocate collaborative efforts with the parents and the community for the growth of the children. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.