Academic journal article Indian Journal of Positive Psychology

Comparison between Social Anxiety, Fear of Negative Evaluation and Irrational Beliefs in Male and Female Students of Ninth Grade in Fasa in Academic Year 2017-2018

Academic journal article Indian Journal of Positive Psychology

Comparison between Social Anxiety, Fear of Negative Evaluation and Irrational Beliefs in Male and Female Students of Ninth Grade in Fasa in Academic Year 2017-2018

Article excerpt

Adolescence is usually associated with an increase in independence by a parent or legal guardian and less supervision, unlike preadolescence. At this age, adolescents are preparing to enter a larger community that can be anxious for the teenager, so as researchers acknowledge that having healthy social connections is one of the most important components of a healthy personality. All theories and psychology schools have discussed the importance of social communication, so that in some theories, as in the theory of Sullivan interpersonal relationships, the foundations of this view are interpersonal relations, namely, Mo'yidfar, Aghamohammadian, and Tabatabaei (2007). Despite the prevalence and severity of this disorder, the research conducted in this field did not fully understand the root cause of social anxiety, and each of them considered it as a factor. Evidence suggests that an agent alone does not determine the behavior of individuals. But many factors play a role in creating and shaping behavior, and most human behaviors are multi-agent. One of the factors that seem to be overwhelmed with this anxiety is fear of negative evaluation, and the other is illogical beliefs. Albert Ellis's rational-emotional-behavioral theory is one of the cognitive theories that introduce a variety of irrational beliefs as the main cause of human problems. Ellis roots many discomforts as human behavioral and mental disorders in a variety of irrational beliefs and beliefs about the world around them (Abadi & Nasseri, 2015). Eleven thoughts or irrational beliefs, or the eleven principles of Ellis (1970) are: the expectation of confirming others from excessive expectations, blaming oneself and others, responding to helplessness with the failure of emotional irresponsibility, distressing attention, avoiding the problem of helpless attachment Against change and perfectionism (Motamedin & Ebadi, 2008). Individuals with anxiety disorder often behave in a manner that avoids exposing others to negative assessments. For example, these people appear to be more serious and diligent in carrying out those assignments than ordinary people when they believe their efforts to do boring and repetitive assignments are confirmed by others (Watson & Freund, 1969). Ultimately, these people are more sensitive to the choice of positive phrases in their relationships with others-especially in face-to-face conversations (Lori, 1983; quoted from Gravand et al., 2011). According to research findings, these individuals are identified with biases in the following: Negative interpretation of external social events Detection of negative responses from others Concentration of attention between external processing and self-centered processing Use of internal information to build Amindset about how others look like a reminder of negative information about their functions, as well as a variety of post-event processing and failure predictions before confronting the situation. Patients with this disorder often face the frightening social situation during the confrontation and even after confronting the rumination about their failure and how they are seen from others, and this rumination of thought leads to anxiety in them. In addition, avoiding horrific situations in anxiety disorders leads to failure in discovering things that are not dangerous. Also, the finer forms of protective behaviors in patients with social phobia, such as avoiding self-disclosure to the opposite side, negatively affect the response of others, and this leads to a negative reaction to the social response (Mahmoudi et al., 2010). In addition, avoiding horrific situations in anxiety disorders leads to failure in discovering things that are not dangerous. Also, the more subtle forms of protective behaviors in patients with social phobia, such as avoiding self-disclosure to the opposite side, negatively affect the response of others and this leads to a negative reaction to the social response (Mahmoudi et al. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.