Academic journal article Homeland Security Affairs

Suicide in Law Enforcement: Protecting Those Who Serve

Academic journal article Homeland Security Affairs

Suicide in Law Enforcement: Protecting Those Who Serve

Article excerpt

The men and women of law enforcement are the first line of defense for the United States’ homeland security. Their mental wellbeing is essential, as they are required to make life-or-death decisions in the course of protecting the citizens they serve. Yet more than 100 law enforcement professionals take their lives through suicide each year.[1] Suicide rates also have increased in the post-9/11 armed forces as the United States continues to participate in conflicts.[2] Although both of these communities—law enforcement and the military—address suicide intervention and prevention through strategies and programs, the problem persists.

The purpose of this research was to analyze various suicide intervention and prevention programs used by military and law enforcement communities to determine whether they are effective in reducing suicides over a measured period of time. Two case studies were compared: the Air Force Suicide Prevention Program, and the Montreal Police Department’s Together for Life suicide prevention program. In addition to the case studies, the research analyzed four individual prevention strategies: pre-employment psychological screening, peer counseling programs, gatekeeper programs, and employee assistance programs. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.