Academic journal article International Journal of Child Health and Human Development

Young Adults and Awareness of Alzheimer's Disease: A Meta-Analysis

Academic journal article International Journal of Child Health and Human Development

Young Adults and Awareness of Alzheimer's Disease: A Meta-Analysis

Article excerpt

Introduction

Tools have been developed for healthcare professionals to improve quality of care for dementia and Alzheimer's patients (1). However, this is not a perfect solution. Since there is no cure for Alzheimer's disease on the horizon, another method to improve quality of life for patients would be to increase awareness of the disease amongst family members to have more conscientious caregivers (2).

Studies have looked the awareness level of young adults across the globe. For example, 75% of young adults in London, Canada, have been reported to be well-aware of the disease, but only 48% believed that they were knowledgeable (3). The aim of this review was to identify existing literature and synthesize the data to observe if there are any overarching trends between young adults in various locations.

Methods

A literature search was conducted in databases, such as Ovid MEDLINE, OLDMEDLINE, Embase Classic, Embase and PsycINFO. Relevant studies were screened to determine whether it reported about awareness level of young adults with respect to Alzheimer's disease. The extracted endpoints were: self-belief levels of awareness, and actual awareness levels based on scores of knowledge questions. These endpoints were compiled into a table and summed to produce a weighted average for each endpoint.

Results

A total of 12 studies (3-14) were identified to be included in the meta-analysis. Of the 12, six (3-8) were carried out in the Canadian Province of Ontario, and two more were carried out in the Provinces of Saskatchewan (9) and Quebec (10). Another two studies (11, 12) were carried out in the States of New York and North Carolina, in the United States; two studies were conducted outside of North America, in Dublin, Ireland (13) and Asia (14).

43%, 31% and 53% of young adults in the Provinces of Ontario, Saskatchewan and Quebec, respectively, believed that they were knowledgeable about Alzheimer's disease. Across all Canadian studies, 44% acknowledged themselves as well-aware. 49% of young adults in the United States of America and 44% of those outside North America similarly recognized themselves as knowledgeable about the disease. Overall, 44% of young adults registered themselves as knowledgeable (see Table 1).

Young adults in the USA recognized that Alzheimer's is a subtype of dementia less frequently than those in Canada and Outside of North America (67%, vs 77% and 76%, respectively). Young adults in general, regardless of demographic region, correctly responded to the question at a rate of 76% (see Table 2).

With respect to the question about whether Alzheimer's is a normal aspect of aging, young adults in USA responded at a higher frequency that it is not normal - 87%. Young adults in Canada made a similar remark at 81% frequency, followed by 80% for young adults outside of North America (see Table 3).

Young adults answered that Alzheimer's worsens over time at a rate of 89% (11) to 100% (4, 6). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.