Academic journal article Arab Studies Quarterly

Editor's Note

Academic journal article Arab Studies Quarterly

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

Syrme Hout's focus is on code-switching between English and Arabic in Rabih Alameddine's "Koolaids: The Art of War." While in the novel, gay Lebanese men find English as the "emancipatory language of coming out and self-acceptance," Mohammad, a painter, reverts back to Arabic as he battles AIDS.

Hout draws on psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, translation, and medical/neurological studies to analyze the multiple encounters that Mohammad had with Lebanese and American characters in regard to strategies of exclusion/inclusion of characters or readers. Hout argues that although Arabic words employed are sparse, "implied code-switching and the dynamics of speaker(s), interlocutor(s), setting(s), and context(s) establish links among AIDS, Arabic, art, and acceptance of death." Hout's analysis shows that minimal code-switching is not the same as shallow multilingualism. It also enriches Arab American literature "by focusing on the emotional rather than the national/ethnic facets of the embedded native language."

Lynn Darwich and Sirene Harb's "Violent Intersectionalities and Experiences of Marked Arabness in Randa Jarrar's A Map of Home" analyze the relationship among "power, normativity, and value in Arab American fiction. …

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