Academic journal article Journal of Information Ethics

Disconnected: Youth, New Media, and the Ethics Gap

Academic journal article Journal of Information Ethics

Disconnected: Youth, New Media, and the Ethics Gap

Article excerpt

Disconnected: Youth, New Media, and the Ethics Gap

Carrie James. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2014. 167 pp. $25.95

This volume is part of a series on digital media and learning, and it presents the results of a qualitative survey (conducted during a six year period) of young people and how they feel about their digital lives. Four tables offer a detailed set of demographic data (including age, sex, race, and mother's education) for 61 teens and young adults, 42 tweens, 40 adults, and eight 14-20 year old digital citizens. But there is no correlation between the data and the answers to the questions posed. Indeed, there are no questions evident here. What we do have are individual responses to scenarios. It is not merely that youngsters (and people in general) have blind spots, are disconnected, or fail to act ethically, often they give such matters little thought and if they do, they prefer the free pirated movie to knowing that abjuring it is the right thing to do.

Upon presentation of the scenarios, respondents offer comments (on privacy here): "[I'd] be disappointing the coach and disappointing my team..." and so on. And the author cites percentages: "Sixteen percent of the teens and young adults were primarily moral thinkers. …

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