Academic journal article Gender & Behaviour

Differences of Paternal and Maternal Parenting on Attitude towards Premarital Sex among Some Selected Youths in an Academic Setting

Academic journal article Gender & Behaviour

Differences of Paternal and Maternal Parenting on Attitude towards Premarital Sex among Some Selected Youths in an Academic Setting

Article excerpt

Introduction

There is a worldwide increase in the number of adolescents and youths engaging in premarital sexual practices due to the changing moral values on abstinence before marriage (Chamie, 2018) and advent of modern contraception (Udigwe, Adogu, Nwabueze, Adinma, Ubajaka & Onwasigwe, 2014; Fernández-Villaverde, Greenwood & Guner, 2010). In the primitive era, abstinence before marriage was regarded as a thing of value and pride, with an associated advantages in reduction of abortion procurement, out-of-wedlock births and contracting of sexually transmitted diseases (Olawa, Aroso, Ayodele, & Ajiboye, 2018). Evidence show that pre-marital sex among teenagers in the 1900 was a rear phenomenon with an insignificant rate of 6% as compared to 75% prevalence recorded in modern times (Greenwood & Guner, 2008). Although university education provides opportunity for youths to pursue academic excellence in order to prepare for life and successful career (Fuller, 2018), it is also known that environments of many universities encourage some level of freedom for students to engage in premarital sexual activities (Abdullahi & Abdullahi, cited in Ajidahun, 2017). For example, most universities do not have enough hostels to accommodate the increasing number of yearly enrolments, thus necessitating renting of apartments in off-campus locations where students' activities are almost unrestricted (Fatunde, 2010). Conditions in private hostels may encourage cohabitation and engagement in sex before marriage (Duyilemi, Tunde-Awe & Lois, 2018). In addition, with little or no parental guidance and monitoring during university life, undergraduates remain vulnerable to undertaking "sexual experimentation" before receiving the nuptial blessings (Duyilemi et al., 2018).

Studies have provided the prevalence of premarital sex among university students in Nigeria. For example, Stephen and Stephen (2016) found a prevalence of 60.2% among undergraduates in a university located in the south-south region. In addition, 63% of study sample size supported that sexual intercourse should be practiced before entering into marriage. Similar rate (59.6%) was obtained for premarital sex in another university within the south-west region where those who had their first sexual experience as teenagers and had 2 or more sexual partners constitute 57.6% and 64.8% respectively (Odimegwu & Adedini, 2013). Also, in samples of undergraduates from three universities in the south west, Oluwatosin and Adediwura (2010) reported that almost 61% of participants had engaged in one form of risky sexual behaviors or the other. The alarming incidence of premarital sex among teenagers and youths in modern times (Alo & Akinde, 2010) calls for significant attention given that it may predispose this population to having unprotected sex, unwanted pregnancy, contracting HIV/AIDS infection, dwindling academic performance, feeling of regret and guilt, and depressive feelings (Ajaegbu, 2015; Stephen & Stephen, 2016), abortion (Bhatta, Koirala & Jha, 2013) and late marriage (Berliana, Utami, Efendi & Kurniati, 2018). Premarital sex permissiveness is also found to weaken the institution of marriage and encourage divorce given that married individuals with permissive premarital sexual attitudes have higher propensity of cheating on their spouse (Peck, 2018; Wolfinger, 2016).

Asides the evolution of modern contraception and the shift in moral values on abstinence (Greenwood & Guner, 2008), studies have examined the various socio-psychological factors that may predict premarital sexual behaviors and attitudes in youths. Among these are being male (Behulu, Anteneh & Aynalem, 2019; Akibu, Gebresellasie, Zekarias, Tsegaye, 2017; Berliana, Utami, Efendi & Kurniati, 2018), viewing of pornographic films (Akibu et al., 2017; Bogale & Seme, 2014), alcohol use and inadequate knowledge of reproductive health (Fehintola, Fehintola, Ogunlaja, Akinola, Awotunde. …

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