Academic journal article The Journal of Hip Hop Studies

Foreword

Academic journal article The Journal of Hip Hop Studies

Foreword

Article excerpt

In 2017, Professor Cassandra Chaney at Louisiana State University (LSU) had an idea to do a special issue on Hip Hop and Religion. She spoke with Doctoral Candidate, Travis Harris and Dr. Daniel Hodge to "set off" the tremendous amount of work to start this process. With a growing appreciation for Hip Hop, as it relates to discourses associated with Black romance (Chaney, 2010) and Black motherhood (Chaney and Brown, 2016; Chaney and Brown, 2015), Chaney began to realize that over the past several decades, an increasing number of Hip Hop artists have become more vocal about how they perceive God, religion, spirituality, and heaven. Sometimes these artists support a traditional (Western) religiosity in which believing in God and/or a Higher Power, bible reading, prayer, and song are intrinsic cornerstones. At other times, these artists reject traditional religiosity in favor of a more global manifestation through which they connect with and allow God and/or a Higher Power or their higher moral (spiritual) selves to guide how they interact with and react to others. Still at other times, these artists promote an amalgamation of religious practices and spiritual mindfulness that balances frustration with society and hope for positive change. …

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