Joyce Carol Oates

Joyce Carol Oates, 1938–, American author, b. Lockport, N.Y., grad. B.A., Syracuse Univ., 1960, M.A., Univ. of Wisconsin, 1961. She taught English at the Univ. of Detroit and the Univ. of Windsor, Ontario, Canada, and has been affiliated with Princeton since 1978. Oates writes about contemporary American life, which she sees as often defined by violence. She is particularly concerned with the connection between violence and love. Her characters are mainly ordinary, inarticulate people who sublimate the terrible things that happen to them. Although some of her novels have been labeled gothic, the violence in them is neither mysterious nor necessarily dramatic; it occurs randomly as in everyday life.

Extraordinarily prolific, Oates has published some 140 books in a variety of genres, among them dozens of novels. These include With Shuddering Fall (1964); a trilogy: A Garden of Earthly Delights (1967, rev. ed. 2003), Expensive People (1968), and them (1969); Wonderland (1971); Childwold (1976); Cybele (1979); Bellefleur (1980); Solstice (1985); Because It Is Bitter, and Because It Is My Heart (1990); What I Lived For (1994); My Heart Laid Bare (1998); Blonde (2000), a fictional work based on the life of Marilyn Monroe; Mudwoman (2012); a Gothic mystery, The Accursed (2013); and a novel about murderous U.S. abortion wars, A Book of American Martyrs (2017). Oates's numerous short stories are collected in such volumes as Wheel of Love (1970), A Sentimental Education (1981), Heat (1991), Will You Always Love Me? (1996), Faithless (2001), and Wild Nights! (2008). Oates also has written thrillers as Rosamond Smith, plus poems, plays, and children's fiction. Her nonfiction includes a book on boxing (1988); A Widow's Story (2011), which chronicles the aftermath of her husband's sudden death; The Lost Landscape: A Writer's Coming of Age (2015); and essays, reviews, and literary criticism.

See G. Johnson, ed., The Journal of Joyce Carol Oates, 1973–1982 (2007); L. Milazzo, ed., Conversations with Joyce Carol Oates (1989); biography by G. Johnson (1998); studies by L. W. Wagner, ed. (1979), E. G. Friedman (1980), T. Norman (1984), H. Bloom, ed. (1987), J. V. Creighton (1992), M. C. Wesley (1993), G. Johnson (1987 and 1994), B. Daly (1996), and G. Cologne-Brookes (2005).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2018, The Columbia University Press.

Joyce Carol Oates: Selected full-text books and articles

Snapshots: 20th Century Mother-Daughter Fiction By Janet Berliner; Joyce Carol Oates David R. Godine, 2000
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Postwar Academic Fiction: Satire, Ethics, Community By Kenneth Womack Palgrave, 2002
Librarian's tip: Chap. 5 "Searching for Goodness and the Ethical Self: Joyce Carol Oates's The Hungry Ghosts"
From Naturalistic Savagery to Humanistic Redemption: Artistic Transformations in Joyce Carol Oates’s Short Stories By Anand, Aswathi Velayathikode; Chatterjee, Srirupa IUP Journal of English Studies, Vol. 12, No. 2, June 2017
The Shape of Our Despair: The Fiction of Joyce Carol Oates By Schilling, Timothy P Commonweal, Vol. 132, No. 13, July 15, 2005
The Fairest in the Land: Blonde and Black Water, the Nonfiction Novels of Joyce Carol Oates By Warner, Sharon Oard Studies in the Novel, Vol. 38, No. 4, Winter 2006
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Feminism, Masculinity, and Nation in Joyce Carol Oates's Fiction By Friedman, Ellen G Studies in the Novel, Vol. 38, No. 4, Winter 2006
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Postgothic Fiction: Joyce Carol Oates Turns the Screw on Henry James By Hoeveler, Diane Long Studies in Short Fiction, Vol. 35, No. 4, Fall 1998
Self-Destructive Forces in Oates' Women By Ugur, Neslihan Guler Studies in Literature and Language, Vol. 4, No. 3, May 1, 2012
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Reverence, Rape, Resistance: Joyce Carol Oates and Feminist Film Theory By Wesley, Marilyn C Mosaic (Winnipeg), Vol. 32, No. 3, September 1999
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Written Interviews and a Conversation with Joyce Carol Oates By Cologne-Brookes, Gavin Studies in the Novel, Vol. 38, No. 4, Winter 2006
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Gothic Writers: A Critical and Bibliographical Guide By Douglass H. Thomson; Jack G. Voller; Frederick S. Frank Greenwood Press, 2002
Librarian's tip: "Joyce Carol Oates" begins on p. 303
Great American Writers: Twentieth Century By R. Baird Shuman Marshall Cavendish, vol.8, 2002
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