Madame Bovary (by Gustave Flaubert)

Madame Bovary (by Gustave Flaubert): Selected full-text books and articles

Madame Bovary: Life in a Country Town By Gustave Flaubert; Gerard Hopkins Oxford University Press, 1998
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary By Harold Bloom Chelsea House, 1988
Librarian's tip: This is a book of literary criticism
Emma Bovary By Harold Bloom Chelsea House, 1994
Realism in Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary By Agarwal, Ritu R IUP Journal of English Studies, Vol. 7, No. 1, March 2012
Rethinking Madame Bovary's Motives for Committing Suicide By Paskow, Jacqueline Merriam The Modern Language Review, Vol. 100, No. 2, April 2005
Educating Emma: A Genetic Analysis of Reading in Madame Bovary By Hurlburt, Sarah Nineteenth-Century French Studies, Vol. 40, No. 1-2, Fall-Winter 2011
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Flaubert's "Mystery Play": A Day in the Life of Madame Bovary By Rogers, Peter S Renascence: Essays on Values in Literature, Vol. 57, No. 2, Winter 2005
Breaking the Chain: Women, Theory, and French Realist Fiction By Naomi Schor Columbia University Press, 1985
Librarian's tip: Chap. I "For a Restricted Thematics: Writing, Speech, and Difference in Madame Bovary"
Rhetoric: Readings in French Literature By Michael Hawcroft Oxford University Press, 1999
Librarian's tip: "The Trial of Madame Bovary" begins on p. 47
Vital Signs: Medical Realism in Nineteenth-Century Fiction By Lawrence Rothfield Princeton University Press, 1992
Librarian's tip: Chap. Two "Disarticulating Madame Bovary: Flaubert and the Medicalization of the Real"
The Novel in France: Mme de la Fayette, Laclos, Constant, Stendhal, Balzac, Flaubert, Proust By Martin Turnell New Directions, 1951
Librarian's tip: Discussion of Madame Bovary begins on p. 258
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