Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Tess of the d'Urbervilles: Selected full-text books and articles

Tess of the d'Urbervilles By Thomas Hardy; Juliet Grindle; Simon Gatrell Oxford University Press, 1988
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
I'd Have My Life Unbe: Thomas Hardy's Self-Destructive Characters By Frank R. Giordano Jr University of Alabama Press, 1984
Librarian's tip: Chap. Nine "Tess Durbeyfield: 'She Would Pay to the Uttermost Farthing'"
Language, Violence, and Irrevocability: Speech Acts in "Tess of the D 'Urbervilles." By Nishimura, Satoshi Studies in the Novel, Vol. 37, No. 2, Summer 2005
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
The Literary Detective: 100 Puzzles in Classic Fiction By John Sutherland Oxford University Press, 2000
Librarian's tip: "Thomas Hardy: Tess of the d'Urbervilles: Is Alec a Rapist?" begins on p. 202
The Divided Heroine: A Recurrent Pattern in Six English Novels By H. M. Daleski Holmes & Meier, 1984
Librarian's tip: Chap. 4 "Tess of the d'Urbervilles Mastery and Abandon"
Dreaming Holmberry-Lipped Tess: Aboriginal Reverie and Spectatorial Desire in Tess of the D'urbervilles By Gussow, Adam Studies in the Novel, Vol. 32, No. 4, Winter 2000
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Confessional Subjects: Revelations of Gender and Power in Victorian Literature and Culture By Susan David Bernstein University of North Carolina Press, 1997
Librarian's tip: Chap. 5 "The Un-Intact State: Tess of the d'Urbervilles and Confessions of Sexual and Textual Violence"
Acts of Naming: The Family Plot in Fiction By Michael Ragussis Oxford University Press, 1986
Librarian's tip: Chap. 7 "Tess of the d'Urbervilles"
The Callisto Myth from Ovid to Atwood: Initiation and Rape in Literature By Kathleen Wall McGill-Queens University Press, 1988
Librarian's tip: Chap. Eight "Tess of the d'Urbervilles: The Maid Who Went to the Merry Green Wood"
Women in Literature: Reading through the Lens of Gender By Jerilyn Fisher; Ellen S. Silber Greenwood Press, 2003
Librarian's tip: "Agent or Victim: Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles (1891)" begins on p. 277
Literary Darwinism: Evolution, Human Nature, and Literature By Joseph Carroll Routledge, 2004
Librarian's tip: "Human Universals and Literary Meaning: A Sociobiological Critique of Pride and Prejudice, Villette, O Pioneers!, Anna of the Five Towns, and Tess of the d'Urbervilles" begins on p. 129
New Women, New Novels: Feminism and Early Modernism By Ann L. Ardis Rutgers University Press, 1990
Librarian's tip: Discussion of Tess of the d'Urbervilles begins on p. 72
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