Ding Ling

Ding Ling: Selected full-text books and articles

Women and Writing in Modern China By Wendy Larson Stanford University Press, 1998
Modern Chinese Women Writers: Critical Appraisals By Michael S. Duke M. E. Sharpe, 1989
Librarian's tip: Chap. 1 "Gender and Identity in Ding Ling's Mother"
Modern Chinese Writers: Self-Portrayals By Helmut Martin; Jeffrey Kinkley M. E. Sharpe, 1992
Librarian's tip: "Foolish Dreams: Like a Blind Person Going Fishing" by Ding Ling begins on p. 302
Re-Encounters in China: Notes of a Journey in a Time Capsule By Harold R. Isaacs M. E. Sharpe, Inc., 1985
Librarian's tip: "Ting Ling" begins on p. 76
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Modern Chinese Stories and Novellas, 1919-1949 By Leo Ou-Fan Lee; C. T. Hsia; Joseph S. M. Lau Columbia University Press, 1981
Librarian's tip: "Ting Ling" begins on p. 266
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Revolutionary Literature in China: An Anthology By John David Berninghausen; Ted Huters M. E. Sharpe, Inc., 1976
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
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