Kay Boyle

Kay Boyle, 1903–93, American writer, b. St. Paul, Minn. A European expatriate in the interwar years, she returned to Europe as a correspondent for the New Yorker (1946–53) and subsequently taught English at San Francisco State College (now San Francisco State Univ.). Her novels and stories often illuminate a desperate moment when courageous action is demanded although tragedy will probably result. Among her works are the novel Plagued by Nightingales (1931); short-story collections, Nothing Ever Breaks Except the Heart (1966) and Fifty Stories (1980); and a collection of essays, The Long Walk at San Francisco State and Other Essays (1970).

See biography by J. Mellen (1994).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2017, The Columbia University Press.

Kay Boyle: Selected full-text books and articles

Kay Boyle, Artist and Activist By Sandra Whipple Spanier Southern Illinois University Press, 1986
Faith of a (Woman) Writer By Alice Kessler-Harris; William McBrien Greenwood Press, 1988
America's 93 Greatest Living Authors Present This Is My Best: Over 150 Self-Chosen and Complete Masterpieces, Together with Their Reasons for Their Selections By Whit Burnett Dial Press, 1942
Librarian's tip: "Kay Boyle Story They Weren't Going to Die" begins on p. 1005
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Writers and Writing By Robert Van Gelder Charles Scribner's Sons, 1946
Librarian's tip: "An Interview with Kay Boyle: Expatriate" begins on p. 193
Abortion, Identity Formation, and the Expatriate Woman Writer: H.D. and Kay Boyle in the Twenties By Hollenberg, Donna Twentieth Century Literature, Vol. 40, No. 4, Winter 1994
Occupied Americans: Kay Boyle's Tales of Postwar Germany By Tang, Edward Americana : The Journal of American Popular Culture, 1900 to Present; Hollywood, Vol. 10, No. 2, Fall 2011
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Bedside Manners in Dorothy Parker's "Lady with a Lamp" and Kay Boyle's My Next Bride By Gillette, Meg Studies in American Fiction, Vol. 35, No. 2, Autumn 2007
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
American Novelists of Today By Harry R. Warfel American Book, 1951
Librarian's tip: "Kay Boyle" begins on p. 44
American Women Fiction Writers, 1900-1960 By Harold Bloom Chelsea House, vol.1, 1997
Librarian's tip: "Kay Boyle" begins on p. 33
Classics and Commercials: A Literary Chronicle of the Forties By Edmund Wilson Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1950
Librarian's tip: "Kay Boyle and The Saturday Evening Post" begins on p. 128
American Women Writers, 1900-1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook By Laurie Champion Greenwood Press, 2000
Librarian's tip: "Kay Boyle (1902-1992)" begins on p. 45
The Columbia Companion to the Twentieth-Century American Short Story By Blanche H. Gelfant; Lawrence Graver Columbia University Press, 2000
Librarian's tip: "Kay Boyle (1902–1992)"
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