Will Rogers

Will Rogers (William Penn Adair Rogers), 1879–1935, American humorist, b. Oolagah, Indian Territory (now in Oklahoma). In his youth he worked as a cowboy in Oklahoma, and after traveling over the world, he returned to the United States and worked in vaudeville as a cowboy rope-twirler, joking casually with the audience. He was an immediate success when he joined the Ziegfeld Follies in 1915. Rogers gained a wide audience, starring in more than 70 motion pictures, writing six books, appearing on dozens of radio broadcasts, and writing a popular syndicated newspaper column. His salty comments on the political and social scene made the "cowboy philosopher" widely known. A constant booster of airplane travel, Rogers made several long airplane trips; he was killed with Wiley Post when their plane crashed near Point Barrow, Alaska.

See his autobiography (ed. by D. Day, 1949) and writings (1973); biography by R. D. White, Jr. (2011); D. R. Milsten, An Appreciation of Will Rogers (1976); P. C. Rollins, Will Rogers: A Bio-Bibliography (1984).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2018, The Columbia University Press.

Will Rogers: Selected full-text books and articles

American Original: A Life of Will Rogers By Ray Robinson Oxford University Press, 1996
The Autobiography of Will Rogers By Will Rogers; Donald Day Boston, Houghton Mifflin Co., 1949
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
The Illiterate Digest By Will Rogers A. & C. Boni, 1924
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Letters of a Self-Made Diplomat to His President By Will Rogers; Herbert Johnson A. & C. Boni, vol.1, 1926
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Will Rogers, Ambassador of Good Will, Prince of Wit and Wisdom By P. J. O'Brien; Lowell Thomas John C. Winston, 1935
What Will Rogers Could Teach the Age of Limbaugh By Meacham, Jon The Washington Monthly, Vol. 26, No. 1-2, January-February 1994
Congress: A Laughing Matter By Goode, Stephen Insight on the News, Vol. 12, No. 27, July 22, 1996
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