Apocalypse in Literature

apocalypse

apocalypse (əpŏk´əlĬps) [Gr.,=uncovering], genre represented in early Jewish and in Christian literature in which the secrets of the heavenly world or of the world to come are revealed by angelic mediation within a narrative framework. The genre seems to have arisen in Palestine in the 3d cent. BC, perhaps as a protest against an oppressive and dominant establishment, either Gentile or apostate Jewish. The writing is characterized by otherworldly journeys, visions, animal imagery derived from the common fund of ancient Middle Eastern mythological imagery, and number symbolism. Apocalyptic eschatology is marked by the conviction that God will intervene decisively in the present evil age and vindicate his suffering elect over their oppressors, raising the dead, consigning the wicked to eternal destruction, and establishing a new creation. In the Bible, apocalyptic elements are present in the books of Ezekiel, Isaiah, Joel, Zechariah, and Daniel. The collection known as the Pseudepigrapha contains a number of early Jewish apocalypses, including 1 Enoch, 4 Ezra, and 2 Baruch. In the New Testament the book of Revelation is often called the Apocalypse.

See C. Rowland, The Open Heaven (1982); E. Weber, Apocalypses (1999).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2015, The Columbia University Press.

Apocalypse in Literature: Selected full-text books and articles

After the End: Representations of Post-Apocalypse By James Berger University of Minnesota Press, 1999
The Apocalypse in African-American Fiction By Maxine Lavon Montgomery University Press of Florida, 1996
The New Apocalyptic: Modern American Apocalyptic Fiction and Its Ancient and Modern Cousins By Journal of Religion and Popular Culture, Vol. 20, Fall 2008
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Apocalyptic Visions in Contemporary Mexican Science Fiction By Manickam, Samuel Chasqui, Vol. 41, No. 2, November 2012
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Apocalyptic Visions and Utopian Spaces in Late Victorian and Edwardian Prophecy Fiction By Stahler, Axel Utopian Studies, Vol. 23, No. 1, January 2012
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Family, Gender, and Society in 1950s American Fiction of Nuclear Apocalypse: Shadow on the Hearth, Tomorrow!, the Last Day, and Alas, Babylon By Schwartz, Richard A Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA), Vol. 29, No. 4, December 2006
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Apocalypse & Armada in Kyd's Spanish Tragedy By Frank Ardolino Sixteenth Century Journal Publishers, 1995
James Merrill's Apocalypse By Timothy Materer Cornell University Press, 2000
"Then out of the Rubble": The Apocalypse in David Foster Wallace's Early Fiction By Fest, Bradley J Studies in the Novel, Vol. 44, No. 3, Fall 2012
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
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