Jean Toomer

Jean Toomer, 1894–1967, American writer, b. Washington, D.C., as Nathan Eugene Toomer. A major figure of the Harlem Renaissance, he is known mainly for Cane (1923, rev. ed. 1988, 2011), a collection of stories, poems, and sketches about African-American life in rural Georgia and the urban North. He also wrote other poetry, essays, and plays.

See biography by R. Eldridge and C. E. Kerman (1987); N. Y. McKay, Jean Toomer, Artist (1984); G. Fabre, Jean Toomer and the Harlem Renaissance (2000).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Jean Toomer: Selected full-text books and articles

Masculinist Impulses: Toomer, Hurston, Black Writing, and Modernity
Nathan Grant.
University of Missouri Press, 2004
Jean Toomer, Artist: A Study of His Literary Life and Work, 1894-1936
Nelly Y. McKay.
University of North Carolina Press, 1984
Jean Toomer and the Prison-House of Thought: A Phenomenology of the Spirit
Robert B. Jones.
University of Massachusetts Press, 1993
To Make a New Race: Gurdjieff, Toomer, and the Harlem Renaissance
Jon Woodson.
University Press of Mississippi, 1999
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 1 "Jean Toomer: Beside You Will Stand a Strange Man"
Black American Poets and Dramatists of the Harlem Renaissance
Harold Bloom.
Chelsea House, 1995
Librarian’s tip: "Jean Toomer" begins on p. 129
Jean Toomer's Eternal South
Ramsey, William M.
The Southern Literary Journal, Vol. 36, No. 1, Fall 2003
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
"Always Your Heart": The "Great Design" of Toomer's Cane
Dow, William.
MELUS, Vol. 27, No. 4, Winter 2002
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
"A Small Man in Big Spaces": The New Negro, the Mestizo, and Jean Toomer's Southwestern Writing
Lutenski, Emily.
MELUS, Vol. 33, No. 1, Spring 2008
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
To "Flash White Light from Ebony": The Problem of Modernism in Jean Toomer's Cane
Kodat, Catherine Gunther.
Twentieth Century Literature, Vol. 46, No. 1, Spring 2000
"In the Land of Cotton": Economics and Violence in Jean Toomer's 'Cane.' (African-American Woman Author)
Foley, Barbara.
African American Review, Vol. 32, No. 2, Summer 1998
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
The Reluctant Witness: What Jean Toomer Remembered from Winesburg, Ohio
Scruggs, Charles.
Studies in American Fiction, Vol. 28, No. 1, Spring 2000
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Perspectives of Black Popular Culture
Harry B. Shaw.
Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1990
Librarian’s tip: "Early Criticism of Jean Toomer's Cane: 1923-1932" begins on p. 65
Dialect of Modernism: Race, Language, and Twentieth-Century Literature
Michael North.
Oxford University Press, 1998
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 7 "Two Strangers in the American Language: William Carlos Williams and Jean Toomer"
The Harlem Renaissance: The One and the Many
Mark Helbling.
Greenwood Press, 1999
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 6 "'Worlds of Shadow-Planes and Solids Silently Moving': Jean Toomer, Alfred Stieglitz, Georgia O'Keefe, and Waldo Frank"
Race and the Modern Artist
Heather Hathaway; Josef JaŘab; Jeffrey Melnick.
Oxford University Press, 2003
Librarian’s tip: "Waldo Frank, Jean Toomer, and the Critique of Racial Voyeurism" begins on p. 92
Harlem Renaissance Re-Examined
Victor A. Kramer; Robert A. Russ.
Whitston, 1997 (Revised edition)
Librarian’s tip: "Jean Toomer and the South: Region and Race as Elements within a Literary Imagination" begins on p. 215
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