Max Beerbohm

Beerbohm, Sir Max

Sir Max Beerbohm (bēr´bōm), 1872–1956, English essayist, caricaturist, and parodist. He contributed to the famous Yellow Book while still an undergraduate at Oxford. In 1898 he succeeded G. B. Shaw as drama critic for the Saturday Review. A charming, witty, and elegant man often called "the incomparable Max," a sobriquet originally bestowed upon him by Shaw, Beerbohm was a brilliant parodist and the master of a polished prose style. His works include A Christmas Garland (1912), a collection of parodies on such authors as Joseph Conrad and Thomas Hardy; Zuleika Dobson (1911), an amusing satire on Oxford; Seven Men (1919), stories; and And Even Now (1920) and Mainly on the Air (1947), essays. Beerbohm was accomplished at drawing, and he published several volumes of excellent caricatures, which manage to be at once both genial and malicious. These include The Poet's Corner (1904) and Rossetti and His Circle (1922). He was knighted in 1939 on his return from Italy, where he had lived from 1910.

See collections ed. by S. C. Roberts (1962), D. Cecil (1971), and P. Lopate (2015); his selected letters (1989); N. J. Hall's collection of his caricatures (1997); biographies by D. Cecil (1964) and N. J. Hall (2002); studies by B. Lynch (1974), and L. Danson (1989).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2018, The Columbia University Press.

Max Beerbohm: Selected full-text books and articles

FREE! Seven Men By Max Beerbohm Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1920
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Zuleika Dobson By Max Beerbohm Modern Library, 1926
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
The Works of Max Beerbohm By Max Beerbohm; John Lane John Lane, 1921
Librarian's tip: Includes "The Pervasion of Rouge" also known as "A Defense of Cosmetics" beginning on p. 99
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
The Incomparable Max By Max Beerbohm Dodd Mead, 1962
Yet Again By Max Beerbohm Knopf, 1923
Around Theatres By Max Beerbohm A.A. Knopf, vol.2, 1930
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
The Poet's Corner By John Rothenstein; Max Beerbohm The King Penguin Books, 1943
A Study in Yellow: The Yellow Book and Its Contributors By Katherine Lyon Mix University of Kansas Press, 1960
Max the Caricaturist and Moore: Crossing the Boundaries of Friendship By Hamard, Marie-Claire DQR Studies in Literature, No. 51, January 1, 2013
The "Less Fashionable" Influence of Max Beerbohm on Flannery O'Connor By Hardy, Donald E The Mississippi Quarterly, Vol. 66, No. 2, Spring 2013
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Max Beerbohm's Humanity By Tillinghast, Richard New Criterion, Vol. 34, No. 2, October 2015
Beerbohm Redrawn: Why the Incomparable Max Is Still the Greatest Writer You Haven't Read By Stove, R. J The American Conservative, Vol. 13, No. 2, March-April 2014
Cyclopedia of World Authors By Dayton Kohler; Frank N. Magill Harper & Row, 1958
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