Mary Robinson (Writer)

Mary Robinson (Writer): Selected full-text books and articles

From Lyrical Ballads to Lyrical Tales: Mary Robinson's Reputation and the Problem of Literary Debt By Cross, Ashley J Studies in Romanticism, Vol. 40, No. 4, Winter 2001
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Re-Visioning Romanticism: British Women Writers, 1776-1837 By Carol Shiner Wilson; Joel Haefner University of Pennsylvania Press, 1994
Librarian's tip: "Mary Robinson's Lyrical Tales in Context" begins on p. 17, and "Becoming an Author: Mary Robinson's Memoirs and the Origins of the Woman Artist's Autobiography" begins on p. 36
Fatal Women of Romanticism By Adriana Craciun Cambridge University Press, 2003
Librarian's tip: Chap. 2 "Violence against Difference: Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Robinson, and Women's Strength"
The Poetics of Sensibility: A Revolution in Literary Style By Jerome McGann Clarendon Press, 1998
Librarian's tip: Chap. 10 "Mary Robinson and the Myth of Sappho"
Studies in the Literary Backgrounds of English Radicalism: With Special Reference to the French Revolution By M. Ray Adams Franklin and Marshall College Studies, 1947
Librarian's tip: Chap. IV "Mrs. Mary Robinson: A Study of Her Later Career"
A Century of Sonnets: The Romantic-Era Revival 1750-1850 By Paula R. Feldman; Daniel Robinson Oxford University Press, 2003
Librarian's tip: "Mary Robinson (1758-1800)" begins on p. 73
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Eighteenth-Century Women Poets: An Oxford Anthology By Roger Lonsdale Oxford University Press, 1989
Librarian's tip: Discussion of Mary Robinson begins on p. 468
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Romantic Medievalism: History and the Romantic Literary Ideal By Elizabeth A. Fay Palgrave, 2002
Librarian's tip: "The Female Troubadour: Mary Robinson and the LEL" begins on p. 54
FREE! The Romantic Movement in English Poetry By Arthur Symons E.P. Dutton, 1909
Librarian's tip: Discussion of Mary Robinson begins on p. 61
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