Helen of Troy

Helen of Troy: Selected full-text books and articles

Medea; Hippolytus; Electra; Helen By Euripides; James Morwood Clarendon Press, 1997
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Helen of Troy and Her Shameless Phantom By Norman Austin Cornell University Press, 1994
Women on the Edge: Four Plays by Euripides By Euripides; Ruby Blondell; Mary-Kay Gamel; Nancy Sorkin Rabinowitz; Bella Zweig Routledge, 1999
Librarian's tip: "Helen" begins on p. 217
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Helen By Euripides; Robert Emmet Meagher University of Massachusetts Press, 1986
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
FREE! Troy: Its Legend, History and Literature: By S. G. W. Benjamin Charles Scribner's Sons, 1880
Librarian's tip: Chap. II "Helen"
FREE! Tales of Troy and Greece By Andrew Lang; H. J. Ford Longmans, Green, 1907
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Gods and Heroes of the Greeks: The Library of Apollodorus By Apollodorus; Leonard Baskin; Michael Simpson University of Massachusetts Press, 1976
Librarian's tip: Chap. Ten "Agamemnon and Menelaus, Sons of Atreus, and Their Marriages with Clytemnestra and Helen" and Chap. 11 "The Trojan War"
The Myths of Greece & Rome By H. A. Guerber Biblo-Moser, 1990
Librarian's tip: Chap. XXV "The Trojan War"
The Legends of Troy in Art and Literature By Margaret R. Scherer Phaidon Press, 1964 (2nd edition)
The Seege or Batayle of Troye: A Middle English Metrical Romance By Mary Elizabeth Barnicle H. Milford, Oxford University Press, 1927
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
The Fall of Troy in Early Greek Poetry and Art By Michael J. Anderson Clarendon Press, 1997
Troilus and Criseyde By Geoffrey Chaucer; Barry Windeatt Oxford University Press, 1998
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
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