Dave Eggers

Dave Eggers, 1970–, American writer, publisher, and educator, b. Boston. He began as an editor at Salon.com and a writer for several publications, founded a small magazine, and wrote a newspaper comic strip. In 2000 Eggers burst on the literary scene with A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, the partly fictionalized memoir about his raising, at age 21, his eight-year-old brother after their parents' deaths. Praised for its inventiveness, skillful writing, and original use of postmodern techniques, it became a bestseller. His later nonfiction includes Surviving Justice: America's Wrongfully Convicted and Exonerated (2005) and Zeitoun (2009), a tale of a Syrian immigrant's trials with Hurricane Katrina and the New Orleans police. Among his novels are the acclaimed What Is the What (2006), an eloquent story of one of the lost boys of Sudan; The Wild Things (2009), inspired by Sendak's book; and A Hologram for the King (2012), in which an American consultant grapples with globalization as he attempts to do business in Saudi Arabia. Eggers also has written short stories and screenplays, and has founded (1998) a publishing house and initiated (2002) a writing program for inner-city children that now has branches in several American cities.

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2017, The Columbia University Press.

Dave Eggers: Selected full-text books and articles

Understanding Dave Eggers By Timothy W. Galow University of South Carolina Press, 2014
The Voices of Others: Dave Eggers and New Directions for Testimony Narrative and Cosmopolitan Literary Collaboration By Yost, Brian ARIEL, Vol. 42, No. 1, January 2011
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
The Slate Diaries By Jodi Kantor; Cyrus Krohn; Judith Shulevitz PublicAffairs, 2000
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
An Interview with Dave Eggers about Zeitoun By Shivani, Anis Colorado Review: a journal of contemporary literature, Vol. 37, No. 2, Summer 2010
Dave Eggers By Siegal, Nina The Progressive, Vol. 71, No. 11, November 2007
Gen X Literary Phenom Dave Eggers Discusses His Latest Bestseller, Zeitoun By Twair, Pat; Twair, Samir Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, Vol. 28, No. 8, November 2009
Putting on the Clown Suit: Dave Eggers Isn't Finished with Fiction Just Yet By Elmhirst, Sophie New Statesman (1996), Vol. 140, No. 5049, April 18, 2011
Finite Jest By Confessore, Nicholas The American Prospect, Vol. 11, No. 15, June 19, 2000
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