Callimachus

Callimachus (fl. c.280–45 BC, Hellenistic Greek poet and critic)

Callimachus, fl. c.280–45 BC, Hellenistic Greek poet and critic, b. Cyrene. Educated at Athens, he taught before obtaining work in the Alexandrian library. There he drew up a catalog, with such copious notes that it constituted a full literary history. He also wrote criticism and other works in prose, but is most notable as a poet. It is said that he wrote more than 800 different pieces. Of these, six hymns (meant for reading, with no religious use), a number of epigrams, and fragments of other poems survive. His greatest work was the Aetia, a collection of legends. Other longer poems of which fragments survive are The Lock of Berenice,Hecale, and Iambi. Callimachus' poetry is notable for brevity, polish, wit, learning, and inventiveness in form. He engaged in a famous literary quarrel with Apollonius of Rhodes over whether well-crafted short poems were superior to long poems. His works had a considerable influence on later Greek and Roman poets, especially Catullus.

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2018, The Columbia University Press.

Callimachus: Selected full-text books and articles

Callimachus: the Hymns By Callimachus; Susan A. Stephens; Susan A. Stephens Oxford University Press, 2015
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Callimachus: Hymn to Apollo, a Commentary By Frederick Williams Oxford University, 1978
Callimachus' Book of Iambi By Arnd Kerkhecker Oxford University, 1999
Polyeideia: The Iambi of Callimachus and the Archaic Iambic Tradition By Benjamin Acosta-Hughes University of California Press, 2002
A Companion to Hellenistic Literature By James J. Clauss; Martine Cuypers Wiley-Blackwell, 2010
Ptolemaic Alexandria By P. M. Fraser Clarendon Press, 1972
Ancient Greek Epigrams: Major Poets in Verse Translation By Gordon L. Fain University of California Press, 2010
Librarian's tip: Chap. 6 "Callimachus"
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Statius, Orpheus, and Callimachus Thebaid 2.269-96 By Chinn, Christopher Matthew Helios, Vol. 38, No. 1, Spring 2011
Fifty Key Classical Authors By Alison Sharrock; Rhiannon Ash Routledge, 2002
Dictionary of World Biography: The Ancient World By Frank N. Magill Fitzroy Dearborn, vol.1, 1998
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