George MacDonald

George Macdonald, 1824–1905, Scottish author. Ordained a Congregational minister, he eventually abandoned his vocation to become a writer and freelance preacher. His first published works were several volumes of poetry, including the narrative poem Within and Without (1855), Phantastes (1858), and Lilith (1895), the last two both moral allegories. Macdonald achieved his first real success with his novels of life in rural Scotland, notably David Elginbrod (1863), Alec Forbes (1865), and Robert Falconer (1867). His lasting reputation, however, rests upon his superb allegorical fairy stories for children; they include At the Back of the North Wind (1871), The Princess and the Goblin (1872), and The Princess and Curdie (1882).

See biography by his son Greville Macdonald (1924, repr. 1971).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2018, The Columbia University Press.

George MacDonald: Selected full-text books and articles

The Gold Thread: Essays on George MacDonald By William Raeper Edinburgh University Press, 1990
Lilith: A Romance By George Macdonald William B. Eerdmans, 2000
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
FREE! At the Back of the North Wind By Elizabeth Lewis; George MacDonald J. B. Lippincott Co., 1914
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Sir Gibbie By George MacDonald Hurst and Blackett, Limited, 1880
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
FREE! The Princess and Curdie By Elizabeth Lewis; George MacDonald; Maria L. Kirk Lippincott, 1914
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Phantastes: A Faerie Romance By George Macdonald William B. Eerdmans, 2000
The Light Princess, and Other Stories By George Macdonald William B. Eerdmans, 1980
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Cosmic and Psychological Redemption in George MacDonald's Lilith By Gaarden, Bonnie Studies in the Novel, Vol. 37, No. 1, Spring 2005
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
George MacDonald's Romantic Christianity in Lilith By McCann, Janet Renascence: Essays on Values in Literature, Vol. 54, No. 2, Winter 2002
Hovering between Irony and Innocence: George MacDonald's "The Light Princess" and the Gravity of Childhood By Billone, Amy Mosaic (Winnipeg), Vol. 37, No. 1, March 2004
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Pullman, Lewis, MacDonald, and the Anxiety of Influence By Gray, William Mythlore, Vol. 25, No. 3-4, Spring-Summer 2007
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
The Art of Manliness: Ekphrasis And/as Masculinity in George MacDonald's Phantastes By Pionke, Albert D Studies in the Novel, Vol. 43, No. 1, Spring 2011
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature By Humphrey Carpenter; Mari Prichard Oxford University Press, 1999
Looking for a topic idea? Use Questia's Topic Generator
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.