Charles Ives

Charles Ives (īvz), 1874–1954, American composer and organist, b. Danbury, Conn., grad. Yale, 1898; pupil of Dudley Buck and Horatio Parker. He was an organist (1893–1904) in churches in Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York. In the insurance business from 1898 to 1930, Ives was concurrently composing music that was extremely original, iconoclastic, and advanced in style, anticipating some of the innovations of Schoenberg and Stravinsky, but not influencing musical trends because most of his works were not published as they were written. They were little known until 1939, when performance of his second piano sonata, Concord (1911–15), won him wide recognition. In 1947 his Third Symphony was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. Ives's compositions include four numbered symphonies, orchestral suites, sonatas, organ pieces, choral works, a great deal of chamber music, and about 150 songs. His works are frequently dissonant, harmonically dense, and lushly scored with complexly layered themes, textures, and rhythms. In addition, he often uses vernacular American music, e.g., folk music, hymns and spirituals, marches, dances, rags, blues, and parlor songs, in his compositions, evoking the spirit of such aspects of American life as revival meetings and brass-band parades.

See his Essays before a Sonata (new ed. 1962) and his Memos, ed. by J. E. Kirkpatrick (1972); biographies by H. and S. Cowell (rev. ed. 1969) and S. Budiansky (2014); V. Perlis, Charles Ives Remembered (1974); R. S. Perry, Charles Ives and the American Mind (1974); H. W. Hitchcock, Ives (1977).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2018, The Columbia University Press.

Charles Ives: Selected full-text books and articles

Selected Correspondence of Charles Ives By Charles Ives; Tom C. Owens University of California Press, 2007
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Angels of Reality: Emersonian Unfoldings in Wright, Stevens, and Ives By David Michael Hertz Southern Illinois University Press, 1993
Charles Ives's Hawthorne By Gollin, Rita K Nathaniel Hawthorne Review, Vol. 32, No. 2, Fall 2006
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Creating Space: Perception and Structure in Charles Ives's Collages By Iverson, Jennifer Music Theory Online, Vol. 17, No. 2, July 2011
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
"A Disturbing Lack of Musical and Stylistic Continuity"? Elliott Carter, Charles Ives, and Musical Borrowing By Thurmaier, David Current Musicology, No. 96, Fall 2013
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Are My Ears on Wrong? By Keough, James; Fulkerson, Gregory Strings, Vol. 19, No. 3, October 2004
A Connecticut Yankee Fifty Years Later By Thurmaier, David Phi Kappa Phi Forum, Vol. 84, No. 4, Fall 2004
Looking for a topic idea? Use Questia's Topic Generator
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.