Administrative Science Quarterly

Administrative Science Quarterly is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal publishing theoretical and empirical work aimed at advancing the study of organizational behavior and theory. Administrative Science Quarterly publishes both qualitative and quantitative work, in addition to purely theoretical papers.

Articles from Vol. 41, No. 1, March

Interorganizational Collaboration and the Locus of Innovation: Networks of Learning in Biotechnology
In recent decades, there has been unprecedented growth in corporate partnering and reliance on various forms of external collaboration (Hergert and Morris, 1988; Mowery, 1988; Hagedoorn, 1990, 1995; Badaracco, 1991; Hagedoorn and Schakenraad, 1992; Gulati,...
Justifying Work: Occupational Rhetorics as Resources in Restaurant Kitchens
The chef is not an employee in the common meaning of the word, but a practitioner, an artist, a fabricator. Jean-Paul Aron, The Art of Eating in France (1975: 150) Occupations are, in some measure, a collection of tasks and assignments, set in an organizational...
Organizational Discretion in Responding to Institutional Practices: Hospitals and Cesarean Births
During the past 15 years, organizational theorists have sought to understand why organizations adhere to dominant practices in their interorganizational fields. Neoinstitutional theory has provided a common framework for answering this question. It suggests...
Organizations and Social Systems: Organization Theory's Neglected Mandate
INTRODUCTION Academic specialization rarely involves simply redistributing tasks or topics. The emergence of a field almost always involves pruning back an initially broader set of interests. By sloughing off elements of earlier thought in favor of...
Organizations as Overlapping Jurisdictions: Restoring Reason in Organizational Accounts
The social systems perspective, as Stern and Barley argue, offers something of profound significance for contemporary organizational theorists. We oldsters have an obligation, however, to provide some hindsight on Parsons' writings in the light of contemporary...
Patterns of Competition: The Diffusion of a Market Position in Radio Broadcasting
How do organizations come to adopt a new market position? In markets in which several distinct products can co-exist because consumer tastes are differentiated, choosing a market position is an important strategic decision, but it is also difficult....
The Mandate Is Still Being Honored: In Defense of Weber's Disciples
Bob Stern and Steve Barley have attempted to seize the moral high ground, pointing to what they see as serious shortcomings in the types of research conducted and the direction of development of organizational studies. They claim that students of organizations...
Two Types of Bureaucracy: Enabling and Coercive
Organizational research presents two conflicting views of the human, or attitudinal, outcomes of bureaucracy. According to the negative view, the bureaucratic form of organization stifles creativity, fosters dissatisfaction, and demotivates employees....