Regulation

Goverment regulation.

Articles from Vol. 24, No. 3, Fall

A Costly Benefit: Economic Analysis Does Not Support EPA's New Arsenic Rule. (the Arsenic Controversy)
THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Agency (EPA) recently finalized a rule that would reduce the maximum allowable level of arsenic in drinking water by 80 percent, from the current limit of 50 micrograms per liter ([micro]g/L) to 10 [micro]g/L. As soon...
Arm the Chicks. (the Final Word)
BEFORE WE EVEN GET STARTED, I HAD nothing to do with the title. I always use the word "women." I almost graduated from high school in the '70s, so I know the rules and I know I'm not young enough to use "Gurl" or "Grrrl." I didn't want Regulation to...
Arsenic and Old Facts. (Commentary)
The Burnett-Hahn and Wilson analyses of the proposal to reduce the allowed concentration of arsenic in drinking water differ primarily on one issue: Is the dose-response relationship between arsenic concentrations and cancer sublinear (Burnett-Hahn)...
Bringing JAVA to the CAFE. (Mercatus Reports: Commentary)
At the end of July, after a couple of premature leaks, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) finally released a report advocating higher Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for new automobiles sold in the United States. Changing the CAFE...
Clinton's Brave New Business World: The Bush Administration Must Decide Whether to Continue Its Predecessor's Efforts. (Antitrust)
AN AGGRESSIVE EFFORT TO USE antitrust law to regulate the economy took place almost unnoticed in the last four years of the Clinton presidency. The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) set implicit tests for anticompetitive...
Connecting the Pieces: Interconnection Compensation Rules Are Woefully out of Date. (Telecommunications)
TELECOMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS of many types are developing in today's information economy, and they all need to exchange traffic between each other smoothly. Where networks have local market power (for example, where customers have little or no choice...
Controlling Cloning. (Briefly Noted)
The federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has launched two new salvos in the battle over cloning. Last spring, Dr. Kathryn Zoon, director of the FDA'S Center for Bio logics Evaluation and Research, threatened to shut down any attempts at human...
Ergonomics. (Mercatus Reports)
STATUS: Options under consideration for addressing ergonomics injuries. Last November, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) finalized sweeping new ergonomics regulations that are intended to eliminate or control musculoskeletal...
For the Record
Analyzing Ayres I COMMEND IAN AYRES FOR Aspiring to expand the current categories of the national debate on campaign finance ("Should Campaign Donors Be Identified?" Regulation, Vol. 24, No. 2, Summer 2001). Unlike many commentators, he takes seriously...
Getting out of the Dark: Market-Based Pricing Could Prevent Future Crises. (the California Crisis)
CALIFORNIA IS THE NATION'S LARGEST state, with a population of 34 million, and its economy produces more that all but a handful of nations on the planet. Thus, the electricity shortage that first struck the state more than a year ago caused significant...
Questioning the Conventional "Wisdom": The Causes and Solutions to the California Crisis Are Not as Simple as Some Say. (the California Crisis)
DEREGULATING AN INDUSTRY, LIKE flying an airplane, makes headlines only when there has been crash. Opening electricity markets, formerly a topic of interest to only a few aficionados, has become a major news story thanks to the California experience....
The Arsenic Controversy. (Special Report)
ON THE FINAL DAY OF THE CLINTON PRESIDENCY last January 19, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved a new health and safety standard for public water systems. Under the standard, the allowable concentration of arsenic in drinking water would...
The California Crisis. (Special Report)
LAST WINTER, AMERICANS RECEIVED A LESSON in the fundamentals of economics as blackout after blackout rolled through California. The state, which depends on natural gas-driven turbines and hydroelectric generators to provide two-thirds of its internally...
The Folly of "Smart Growth": Oregon's Experience Suggests "Anti-Sprawl" Strategies Worsen the Problems They Are Intended to Solve. (Property)
THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES, city and state governments are turning to "smart growth" urban planning strategies to slow suburban "sprawl." Spurred by concerns over traffic congestion, air pollution, and loss of open space, the plans are intended to...
The World Bank's Tobacco Economics: Very Creative Welfare Economics Is Being Used to Justify Government Intervention. (Health & Medicine)
ECONOMISTS HAVE ARGUED FOR TWO decades that smokers do not incur larger health care costs than non-smokers. That is because non-smokers, statistically, live longer than smokers and reach ages in which they incur large health care costs. What is more,...
Turing off the Lights: Consumer-Allowed Service Interruptions Could Control Market Power and Decrease Prices. (the California Crisis)
EARLY LAST DECADE, CONGRESS PASSED legislation that allows the deregulation of wholesale electricity production and prices in the United States. Under the legislation, states or regions that implement deregulation must develop restructuring plans for...
Unchaining the Workers. (Briefly Noted)
Since the adoption of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) in 1935, individual workers have been chained to the will of the majority in choosing representatives to bargain over the terms and conditions of employment. Under the NLRA, representation...
Underestimating Arsenic's Risk: The Latest Science Supports Tighter Standards. (the Arsenic Controversy)
ARSENIC HAS LONG BEEN KNOWN TO BE acutely poisonous at high doses. However, if individuals ingest it at subacute doses, they become partially tolerant to the chemical. That makes arsenic the darling of detective story writers: A villain can take subacute...