Renaissance Quarterly

A journal covering art, literature, and history of the Renaissance for the academic audience. Contains research studies, review essays, and book reviews. Features literary works and themes, as well as specialized studies in the arts, religion, and social

Articles from Vol. 50, No. 4, Winter

Anamorphosis through Descartes or Perspective Gone Awry
The systems of perspective First produced during the fifteenth century and subsequently treated by mathematicians and artists in later centuries have been exhaustively discussed and analyzed by art historians. While many have focused on the technique's...
Caprarola's Sala Della Cosmografia
Il pontificato non voul esser cercato, e chi lo cerca non lo trova - Paul III Farnese to Cardinal Allessandro Farnesse (1) The massive Palazzo Farnese at Caprarola looms over its plain, a mute witness to the former power of the family [ILLUSTRATION...
Interpretations of Humanism in Recent Spanish Renaissance Studies
The significant number of new editions of humanistic texts and the publication of articles and books relating to Renaissance humanism that have appeared in Spain during the last twenty years attest to a growing interest in this field. As a result of...
Making a Good Impression: Diana Mantuana's Printmaking Career
In 1576, the year after she married the aspiring architect Francesco da Volterra and moved to Rome, a Mantuan engraver named Diana (known in the twentieth century as Diana Scultori) produced a large, single-sheet engraving of an Ionic volute, richly...
Panormita's Reply to His Critics: The 'Hermaphroditus' and the Literary Defense
In her discussion of imitatio, Julia Haig Gaisser(1) describes how humanist scholars and poets justified their light, titillating compositions, based on Catullus, Martial, and The Priapea, by invoking the ancient literary defense, whose purpose was essentially...
Towards a Reading of Bronzino's Burlesque Poetry
In his "Capitolo in Lode Del Dappoco," a facetious tribute to the worthless person, the painter Agnolo Bronzino (1503-72) muses to his cat Corimbo about how he likes to spend his evenings: "Tu sai Corimbo, che tal volta io leggo/cosi nel letto, per adormentarmi,/o...