Renaissance Quarterly

A journal covering art, literature, and history of the Renaissance for the academic audience. Contains research studies, review essays, and book reviews. Features literary works and themes, as well as specialized studies in the arts, religion, and social

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 4, Winter

Civic Humanism and the Rise of the Medici [*]
This article analyzes the intellectual content of civic humanism in the specific context of Medici power, asking the question: what ideological role did civic humanism play in Medicean Florence? It argues that there is no contradiction between the...
Founding the Palazzo Vecchio in 1299: The Corso Donati Paradox
The usual origin-story of the Palazzo Vecchio as a security measure for the city's executives taken in response to civic unrest does not hold up under a close analysis of the historical record and the architectural evidence. The original project of...
Hamlet and Counter-Humanism
This essay interprets the question of subjectivity in Hamlet by reappraising Renaissance skepticism and by reexamining the medieval debate concerning the misery of man's existence, and the Renaissance celebration of man. A central concern is the significance...
Pastoral Palimpsest: Writing the Laws of Love in L'Astree
Mediated by Neoplatonist thought of the Quattrocento, paradox governs both form and content of Honore d'Urfe's L'Astree. The prefatory epistles to the work's first three parts establish a Foucaldian notion of "author function" while simultaneously...
Report of Independent Certified Public Accountants
Members of the Executive Board and Advisory Council The Renaissance Society of America We have audited the statements of financial position of The Renaissance Society of America (a New York nonprofit organization) as of December 31, 1998 and 1997,...
Translating (Anne) Askew: The Textual Remains of a Sixteenth-Century Heretic and Saint [*]
This essay explores how contemporary depictions of Anne Askew's examination and execution serve at textual sites of contested power between the Henrician conservatives and Protestant reformists who vied for control of English religion and politics...
"Vows to the Blackest Devil": Hamlet and the Evolving Code of Honor in Early Modern England
The Renaissance was a period in which the honor code underwent a significant metamorphosis. The medieval, chivalric code of honor, with its emphasis on lineage, allegiance to one's lord and violence, evolved into an honor code that was both more moral...
What Happened to the Renaissance in the German Academy? A Report on German "Renaissance" Institutes
Where is the research on the Renaissance being done in Germany? Is it true that "European history is still firmly divided among antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the modern era," and that therefore "the Renaissance occupies no space of its own in the...