Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 2, October

Australian Outdoor (and) Environmental Education Research: Senses of "Place" in Two Constituencies
Introduction In an editorial introducing the first issue of Australian Journal of Outdoor Education (AJOE) under its new name, Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education (JOEE), John Quay (2016, p. 1) notes that the "change acknowledges engagement...
Editorial
Welcome to volume 19, issue 2, of the Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education. With this issue, development of the journal continues via an expanded Editorial Board that encompasses a group of highly respected Regional Editors who will support...
Mountaineering Tourism
Mountaineering Tourism Musa, G., Higham, J., & Thomson-Carr, A. (2015). Mountaineering Tourism. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. ISBN: 978-1-138-78237-2 Musa, Higham, and Thompson-Carr have edited a volume intended to provide "a critical...
Outdoor Education and School Curriculum Distinctiveness: More Than Content, More Than Process
Outdoor education in the curriculum (or not) Two major questions have been raised over the last 20 years which attempt to draw outdoor education discourse into a broader discussion of curriculum, not just outdoor education curriculum but curriculum...
Postparadigmatic Materialisms: A "New Movement of Thought" for Outdoor Environmental Education Research?
Introduction My motivation for writing this essay arises, in large part, from my interest in pursuing a very similar question to one that Phillip Payne (2016) poses in the title of his capstone article for a recent special issue of the Journal of...
The "F" Word: Feminism in Outdoor Education
Introduction: The gendered outdoor education landscape When I first entered the outdoor education (OE) profession in the mid '80s, gender disparity was overwhelmingly apparent. The work environment was highly gendered and homogeneous in a range...
What Do Citation Patterns Reveal about the Outdoor Education Field? A Snapshot 2000-2013
Introduction The expanding reach and availability of citation data, particularly due to Google Scholar (GS), have made citation metrics--and patterns--more accessible in the social sciences and humanities and more meaningful, provided differences...
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