The Review of Metaphysics

Founded in 1947, the Review of Metaphysics is a quarterly journal published by the Philosophy Education Society of the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. Its subject matter covers trade, technical and professional publications; philosophy; indexes, abstracts, reports, proceedings and bibliographies. Kenneth Rolling is the managing editor, Dr. Jude P. Dougherty is the editor and Justin West is the book review editor.

Articles from Vol. 57, No. 2, December

American Philosophical Quarterly: Vol. 40, No. 1, January 2004
Knowing and Possessing Knowledge, KELLY BECKER Projectivism and the Last Person Argument, ALAN CARTER A central form of argument within environmental ethics--the Last Person Argument--appeals to our intuitive responses to environmentally destructive...
Australian Journal of Philosophy: Vol 81, No. 3, September 2003
Presentism and Consciousness, NEIL McKINNON The presentist view of time is psychologically appealing. It is argued that, ironically, contingent facts about the temporal properties of consciousness are very difficult to square with presentism unless...
European Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 11, No. 2, August 2003
Personal and Redemptive Forgiveness, CHRISTOPHER BENNETT This paper gives a secular account of forgiveness that examines the question of whether forgiveness can be granted in the absence of the wrong-doer's repentance. It argues that there are two...
European Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 11, No. 3, December 2003
Nietzsche, Re-Evaluation and the Turn to Genealogy, DAVID OWEN This article provides a developmental account of the reasons for Nietzsche's turn to genealogy as a mode of enquiry and, thereby, an interpretive basis for understanding the philosophical...
Heidegger and Duns Scotus on Truth and Language
IT IS SHOCKING THAT IN THE VOLUMINOUS SECONDARY LITERATURE that surrounds Heidegger's relationship to the Middle Ages, or the well-trodden field of "Heidegger and Theology," so few acknowledge the essential relationship between Heidegger's notion of...
Journal of the History of Philosophy: Vol. 41, No. 3, July 2003
Aristotle on the Etruscan Robbers: A Core Text of "Aristotelian Dualism," ABRAHAM P. BOS This paper discusses the two texts by Iamblichus and Augustine which speak about human life as a continuous torture or punishment and which are said to originate...
Journal of the History of Philosophy: Vol. 41, No. 4, October 2003
Augustine and the Cognitive Cause of Stoic 'Preliminary Passions' (Propatheiai), SARAH BYERS Augustine made a significant contribution to the history of philosophical accounts of affectivity which scholars have not yet noticed. He resolved a problem...
Nonexistents Then and Now
I PROBLEM: THE BEING OF NONEXISTENTS. In matters of irreality, medieval philosophers were not much concerned with fiction as such. The prime focus of their attention was theology, and their dealings with nonexistence related to the role of such...
On the Unity of Theoretical Subjectivity in Kant and Fichte
THE BODY OF TEXTS THAT FORMS Fichte's Jena Wissenschaftslehre is among the most significant products of that immensely fertile period spanning the publication of Kant's first Critique and Hegel's Phenomenology. Like many of Kant's earliest disciples...
Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Vol. 66, No. 3, May 2003
Finite Beings, Finite Goods: The Semantics, Metaphysics and Ethics of Naturalist Consequentialism, Part I, RICHARD BOYD Two Kinds of Commitments (And Two Kinds of Social Groups), TALBOT M. BREWER In this paper, the author draws a distinction...
Philosophy: Vol. 78, No. 3, July 2003
Identity, Individuality, and Unity, E. J. LOWE Locke notoriously included number among the primary qualities of bodies and was roundly criticized by Berkeley for doing so. Frege echoed some of Berkeley's criticisms in attacking the idea that number...
Ratio: Vol. 16, No. 2, June 2003
Is Representation Rife? DAVID PAPINEAU This paper applies a teleosemantic perspective to the question of whether there is genuine representation outside the familiar realm of belief-desire psychology. The author first explains how teleosemantics...
Ratio: Vol. 16, No. 3, September 2003
Levels of Reality, JOHN HEIL Philosophers and nonphilosophers have been attracted to the idea that the world incorporates levels of being: higher-level items--ordinary objects, artifacts, human beings--depend on, but are not in any sense reducible...
Revisiting the Myth: Husserl and Sellars on the Given
I IN SCIENCE, PERCEPTION, AND REALITY, Sellars marvels at the power of fashion in philosophy, which all too often offers us the spectacle of a stampede rather than a careful sifting of gold from dross. (1) Sellars was worried that the flight from...
The Monist: Vol. 86, No. 4, October 2003
Art and Mood: Preliminary Notes and Conjectures, NOEL CARROLL Art and Delusion, GREG CURRIE and JON JUREIDINI The authors argue that an encounter with fiction takes place on two, not always separated levels: that of the story and its characters...
The Philosophical Quarterly: Vol. 53, No. 212, July 2003
Future Contingents and Relative Truth, JOHN MACFARLANE If it is not now determined whether there will be a sea battle tomorrow, can an assertion that there will be one be true? The problem has persisted because there are compelling arguments on...
The Philosophical Quarterly: Vol. 53, No. 213, October 2003
Many Many Problems, BRIAN WEATHERSON Supervaluationist solutions to "the problem of the many" typically rely on two principles. First, the root of the problem is that singular terms can be vague, just as predicates can be. Second, the same resolution...
The Philosophical Review: Vol. 111, No. 2, April 2002
Reply to Huemer on the Consequence Argument, HELEN BEEBEE In a recent paper ("Van Inwagen's Consequence Argument," Philosophical Review 109 (2000): 525 44), Michael Huemer defends a version of the Consequence Argument. Part of his defense involves...
The Philosophical Review: Vol. 111, No. 3, July 2002
Reflections on Knowledge and Its Limits, GILBERT HARMAN The author discusses three aspects of Timothy Williamson's important book, Knowledge and Its Limits. First, there are two ways in which mental events might be said to be "internal": (a) the...
Thomas Reid on Natural Signs, Natural Principles, and the Existence of the External World
I AN EMPIRICIST, ONE MIGHT THINK, OUGHT TO BE AGNOSTIC about the existence of the external world. That, anyway, is the received wisdom of respected empiricists such as David Hume. In A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40), book I, part II, section...
Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.