The Review of Metaphysics

Founded in 1947, the Review of Metaphysics is a quarterly journal published by the Philosophy Education Society of the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. Its subject matter covers trade, technical and professional publications; philosophy; indexes, abstracts, reports, proceedings and bibliographies. Kenneth Rolling is the managing editor, Dr. Jude P. Dougherty is the editor and Justin West is the book review editor.

Articles from Vol. 59, No. 1, September

American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly Vol. 79, No. 1, Winter 2005
CURRENT PERIODICAL ARTICLES * On the Rehabilitation of Virtue, MAX SCHELER Max Scheler's essay on virtue, first published under a pseudonym in 1913, begins with some reflection upon the decline in his era of a concern for virtue. Its central...
American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly Vol. 79, No. 2, Spring 2005
Storytelling and Philosophy in Plato's "Republic," JACOB HOWLAND Scholarly convention holds that in Plato's mind logos and muthos are fundamentally opposed, the former being the medium of philosophy and the latter of poetry. The author of this article...
Australasian Journal of Philosophy Vol. 83, No. 2, June 2005
Vagueness as Closeness, NICHOLAS J. J. SMITH This paper presents and defends a definition of vagueness, compares it favorably with alternative definitions, and draws out some consequences of accepting this definition for the project of offering...
Doctoral Dissertations 2004-2005 *
University at Albany (29) (25) (9) JAMES WALKER, "Hegel's Response to Meta-Critical Skepticism in the Phenomenology of Spirit." Adviser: Robert Howell. University of Alberta (37) (32) (15) University of Arizona (42) (42) (20) JOSHUA COWLEY,...
Esoteric versus Latent Teaching
ONE OF THE IDEAS TO WHICH LEO STRAUSS drew the attention of many readers in the last century is that of a difference between exoteric and esoteric philosophical writing. These terms can refer to different kinds of philosophical teaching, one kind intended...
Ethical Criticism in Heidegger's Early Freiburg Lectures
I HISTORY, PHILOSOPHY, CRITICISM. Philosophy has a history because human life is historical. This truism assumes a deeper, more puzzling, and unsettling significance in the programmatic section 6 of Sein und Zeit, which promises nothing less than...
European Journal of Philosophy Vol. 13, No. 2, August 2005
Nietzsche on Truth, Illusion, and Redemption, R. LANIER ANDERSON Nietzsche's views on truth have provoked controversy: some commentators emphasize texts attacking the possibility and/or desirability of truth, while others highlight Nietzsche's praise...
International Philosophical Quarterly Vol. 45, No. 3, September 2005
Modernity and Postmodernity: A False Dichotomy, AVERY FOUTS This article is the third in a series. In the first, the author argues that existence is a property. In the second, based on the fact that existence is a property, he contends that Descartes's...
Journal of Philosophy Vol. 102, No. 2, February 2005
Evaluating Social Reasons: Hobbes vs. Hegel, ANTHONY SIMON LADEN The paper develops a Hegelian approach to the evaluation of social reasons, reasons whose authority derives from norms of a plural subject. The Hegelian approach is contrasted along...
Journal of the History of Philosophy Vol. 43, No. 4, October 2005
Peculiar Perfection: Peter Abelard on Propositional Attitudes, MARTIN LENZ In the course of the debates on Priscian's notion of the perfect sentence, the philosopher Peter Abelard developed a theory that closely resembles modern accounts of propositional...
Metaphysical Foundations of the History of Philosophy: Hegel's 1820 Introduction to the Lectures on the History of Philosophy
HEGEL EXPLICATES HIS THEORY of the history of philosophic thinking in several introductions to the various cycles of Lectures on the History of Philosophy held in Jena, Heidelberg, and Berlin. Only the introductions to the first cycle of Heidelberg...
Mind Vol. 114, No. 455, July 2005
Noise and Perceptual Indiscriminability, BENJ HELLIE Perception represents colors inexactly. This inexactness results from phenomenally manifest noise and results in apparent violations of the transitivity of perceptual indiscriminability. Whether...
Paul Ricoeur (1913-2005)
27 February 1913, in Valence, France, Paul Ricoeur was inscribed into the spatial, temporal, and social register by his birth certificate, son of Jules and Florentine (Favre) Ricoeur. In several of his works, Ricoeur reflects on our birth certificates...
Philosophical Quarterly Vol. 55, No. 219, April 2005
Epistemological Contextualism: Problems and Prospects, MICHAEL BRADY and DUNCAN PRITCHARD Epistemological contextualism has become one of the most important and widely discussed new proposals in the theory of knowledge. This special issue contributes...
Philosophical Quarterly Vol. 55, No. 220, July 2005
Poverty and Rights, JAMES W. NICKEL The author of this paper defends economic and social rights as human rights and as a feasible approach to addressing world poverty. He proposes a modest conception of economic and social rights that includes rights...
Philosophy Vol. 80, No. 2, April 2005
Thought and Action: A Tribute to Stuart Hampshire, P. M. S. HACKER The paper is a tribute to the late Stuart Hampshire's investigations of the ramifying role of intention in our conceptual scheme. It surveys the central argument of Thought and Action...
Phronesis Vol. 50, No. 2, April 2005
Logic and Music in Plato's Phaedo, D. T. J. BAILEY Aristotle on the Best Good: Is Nicomachean Ethics 1094a18-22 Fallacious? PETER B. M. VRANAS The first sentence of Nicomachean Ethics 1.2 has roughly the form: "If A [there is a universal end]...
Ratio Vol. 18, No. 2, June 2005
Life and Meaning, DAVID E. COOPER This paper addresses an apparent tension between a familiar claim about meaning in general, to the effect that the meaning of anything owes to its place, ultimately, within a "form of life," and a claim, also familiar,...
The Common Good
NATURAL LAW ARGUMENTS CONCERNING the political order characteristically appeal, at some point or other, to the common good of the political community. To take the clearest example: Aquinas, perhaps the paradigmatic natural law theorist, appeals to...
The Monist Vol. 88, No. 4, October 2005
Qualitative Unity and the Bundle Theory, DAVID ROBB This is an articulation and defense of a trope-bundle theory of material objects. The paper answers a charge frequently made against the bundle theory, namely, that it commits a conceptual error...
The Monist Vol. 89, No. 1, January 2006
Semantic Regularity and the Liar Paradox, NICHOLAS J. J. SMITH This paper argues that the Liar paradox forces us to abandon the principle of Semantic Regularity, which says that there are perfectly reliable, principled relationships between our...
Visiting Professors from Abroad, 2005-2006
Arun Balasubramaniam University of Toronto National University of Fall 2005-Spring 2006 Singapore Lian Chang University of Notre Dame Beijing University Fall 2005-Spring 2006 P'aat'a Chkheidze...
Wrongs and Faults
I THE ELEMENTARY MORAL DISTINCTION. The ultimate objects of moral assessment are people and their lives. I will call this the "elementary moral distinction." Many today seem to have lost sight of it. How often are we told that we should show respect...
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