The Romanic Review

A quarterly journal devoted to the study of Romance literatures. Articles cover all periods of French, Italian, and Spanish-language literature. Published by the Department of French and Romance Philology of Columbia University.

Articles from Vol. 88, No. 4, November

Anny Duperey: The Silence of Photography
In 1992 Anny Duperey, better known as an actress than as a writer, published Le Voile noir. The work mixes photographs and narrative and is fairly original in its concept. It links photographs, photographer, reader and beholder (reader and narrator)...
El Humorismo, Romantic Irony, and the Carnivalesque World of Galdos's 'El Amigo Manso.' (Benito Perez Galdos)
Bienaventurados los mansos, porque ellos recibiran la tierra por heredad. (Mateo 5.5) The title of comic masterpiece has graced El amigo Manso ever since Galdos's writer-alter ego first plunged a disembodied Maximo Manso in ink and with additional...
Love Letters: Discourses of Gender and Writing in the Criticism of the 'Lettres Portugaises.'
A necdotes about the attribution of the Lettres portugaises have become almost a commonplace in literary publication, a witty lead-in to a paper or article on the history of criticism. Encyclopedias and even the most banal of literary histories include...
The Regime of Substitutions: Panoptical Gluttony in the Modern, "Manageable" World of 'L'Avare.' (Moliere)
Then everything include itself in power, Power into will, will into appetite, And appetite, an universal wolf, So doubly seconded with will and power, Must make perforce an universal prey And last eat up himself ... Shakespeare,...
'Un Bon Esmoucheteur Par Mousches Jamais Emouche Ne Sera': Panurge as Trickster
The riddle of Panurge has occupied the attention of scholars for several generations. Who is this character, what are his parallels in literary history, and what is his role in Rabelais's text? To paraphrase Edwin Duval, Panurge has been associated...
Woman as Savior: The Virgin Mary and the Empress of Rome in Gautier De Coinci's 'Miracles.' ('Miracles De Nostre Dame')
With the exception of the Virgin Mary, the women who appear in Gautier de Coinci's Miracles de Nostre Dame are usually, like the men, fallible human beings--a pregnant abbess, an incestuous mother, or a nun who wishes to marry. As Brigitte Cazelles...
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