The Romanic Review

A quarterly journal devoted to the study of Romance literatures. Articles cover all periods of French, Italian, and Spanish-language literature. Published by the Department of French and Romance Philology of Columbia University.

Articles from Vol. 85, No. 4, November

Between Genders, between Genres: Celimene's Letter to Alceste in Moliere's 'Le Misanthrope.'
To know that one does not write for the other, to know that these things I am going to write will never cause me to be loved by the one I love (the other), to know that writing compensates for nothing, sublimates nothing, that it is precisely there where...
Mallarme and the Madness of Obscurity
Brevis esse laboro, obscuro fio. Horace, De arte poetica(2) Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence... Poe, "Eleonora"(3) Obscurity is often thought of in terms of darkness;...
Pierre Corneille's Medea-Machine
The repertoire of conceptual structures by means of which scholars have read the French seventeenth-century machine play has gained a pertinent and powerful addition with the fluency in the baroque aesthetic which has gradually established itself as...
Sex, Lies, and Fabliaux: Gender, Scribal Practice, and Old/new Philology in "Du Cheualier Qui Fist Les Cons Parler."
The study of Old French literature has recently been animated by intense discussion of the relative merits of both an "old" and a "new" philology. In this debate between late twentieth-century antiqui and moderni, one of the oft-quoted pronouncements...
Something from Nothing: Regenerated Narrative in Mirbeau's 'Le Jardin Des Supplices.' (Octave Mirbeau)
Facetiously dubbed by friend Georges Rodenbach "le don Juan de l'ideal,"(1) fin de siecle novelist and playwright Octave Mirbeau devoted much of his tumultuous literary career to polemical campaigns against his perceived political enemies. Exchanging...
"The Boy Who Was a Girl": Reading Gender in the 'Roman De Silence.'
Medieval romances contain few obvious narrative challenges to the status of the body as the origin of gender: in fiction, as in other cultural discourses, gender identity and social roles are defined by sexual characteristics inscribed on the body at...
The Delusory Denouement and Other Strategies in Maupassant's Fantastic Tales
Tzvetan Todorov's seminal work, Introduction a la litterature fantastique, establishes the fantastic as a genre, defining it as a hesitation between the supernatural and the uncanny. The supernatural, like fantasy, deals with an "unreal" world, a world...
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