The Romanic Review

A quarterly journal devoted to the study of Romance literatures. Articles cover all periods of French, Italian, and Spanish-language literature. Published by the Department of French and Romance Philology of Columbia University.

Articles from Vol. 88, No. 2, March

Japonisme and Decadence: Painting the Prose of 'A Rebours.' (J.-K. Huysmans)
Japonisme represents a cultural phenomenon explored primarily within the context of the visual arts, portrayed customarily in critical studies as an important creative influence on French Impressionist painters of the second half of the nineteenth...
L'histoire Prostituee: Voltaire Contre Larcher, et Contre Lui-Meme
L'histoire ancienne, de l'avis de Voltaire, etait tissue de fables et d'erreurs. Il voulait la lire en philosophe, et que nous la lisions de mime, en nous mefiant des recits des historiens. "Un esprit juste," ecrit-il a ce propos, "en lisant l'histoire,...
Naive and Devious: 'La Religieuse.' (Diderot)
As Jean Catrysse defines it, "La Religieuse est l'aboutissement romanesque d'une mystification dont l'intrigue a ete posterieurement incorporee au recit sous forme de Preface-annexe" (Catrysse, 73). The admirably perverse logic of this formula...
Reader-Investigators in the Post-Nouveau Roman: Lahougue, Peeters, and Perec
It is not impossible to imagine ... a novel whose fiction would be exciting enough so that the reader intensely felt the desire to know its last word which precisely, at the last minute, would be denied to him, the text pointing to itself...
Surface Structure and Symmetry in Maupassant: An Alternative View of 'Deux Amis.'
Maupassant's story about the two friends who, when Paris is besieged during the Franco-Prussian war, ignore the blockade and go fishing, has become important not only because of its own excellence but because it is the subject of a well-known structuralist...
The Subject of America: History and Alterity in Montaigne's "Des Coches."
I. Ancient Tales, Modern Fragments: Narrative and the Essay Near the center of "Des Coches," the sixth chapter of the third book of the Essays, Montaigne pauses to consider the limits of human knowledge. Human reason, he says, is "foible en tous...
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