The Romanic Review

A quarterly journal devoted to the study of Romance literatures. Articles cover all periods of French, Italian, and Spanish-language literature. Published by the Department of French and Romance Philology of Columbia University.

Articles from Vol. 98, No. 2-3, March-May

A Poetics of the Interstice: The Mundane and the Metaphysical in Fervor De Buenos Aires
In his groundbreaking study of Spanish American Posmodernista poetry, Herve Le Corre makes a passing but potentially significant remark on the symbolic role played by the city in Jorge Luis Borges's early lyric (170). Echoing the main thesis of Sylvia...
Bibliography 1996-2006
Books by Jorge Luis Borges Autobiografia: 1899-1999. Buenos Aires: El Ateneo, 1999. Borges: Obras, resenas y traducciones ineditas: Diario Critica 1933-1934. Ed. Irma Zangara. Barcelona: Atlantida, 1999. (This book is an edited version of Borges...
Borges against Peron: A Contextual Approach to "El Fin"
"El fin" is possibly the least studied of all the stories in Borges's Ficciones. It is at first sight a very slight tale in which Borges chose to alter the ending of Jose Hernandez's classic poem El gaucho Martin Fierro (1872; 1879). Its kinship with...
Borges: 'The Reader' in the Twenty-First Century
I gladly accepted Dominique Jullien's invitation last year to edit an homage to Borges on the twentieth anniversary of his death, June 14 1986. I first entered the Borgesian labyrinth via One Hundred Years of Solitude, in the late sixties, guided by...
"El Oriente" by Jorge Luis Borges: A Poetic Bouquet and Emblem of the East
In the system of knowledge about the Orient, the Orient is less a place than a topos, a set of references, a congeries of characteristics, that seems to have its origin in a quotation, or a fragment of a text, or a citation from someone's work on the...
"Emma Zunz" Revisited
Every critic who writes about "Emma Zunz" (1) points out that Emma is one of Borges's rare female protagonists; that hers is a detective story but lacks a detective, and that, despite the fact that Emma's crime is resolved, the story is unfathomable....
In Praise of Mistranslation: The Melancholy Cosmopolitanism of Jorge Luis Borges
Jorge Luis Borges, we are told, devoted the last few weeks of his life to learning Arabic, with the help of an Egyptian teacher living in Switzerland. (1) In this most appropriately enigmatic of Borgesian endings, it is tempting to read two contradictory...
Linguistic Finitude as Capability in Borges and Wittgenstein
Epistemological fantasies were dear to Borges. In a moment characteristic of his short stories, the protagonist and narrator of "La escritura del Dios" ("The God's Script") muses on what he calls the "enigma ... de una sentencia escrita por un dios,"...
Metaphor and Image in Borges's "El Zahir"
One of the most frequently cited lines from the work of Jorge Luis Borges comes from the conclusion of the 1951 essay "The Fearful Sphere of Pascal": "It may be that universal history is the history of the different intonations given a handful of metaphors"...
Nietzsche, Borges, Garcia Marquez on the Art of Memory and Forgetting
The narrator of Borges's tale "Funes the Memorious" quotes in the opening paragraph a strange interpretation of Funes as a precursor to the Nietzschean Superman: "a vernacular and rustic Zarathustra." (1) Nothing could be further from the Superman,...
Shaping the Word: Repression, Archive, and Dialogical Discourse in Jorge Luis Borges's "La Muralla Y Los Libros"
While Borges's non-fictions as well as his fictions brought him international fame, (1) in the writer's own words, his style does not change when he composes essays: "Me pregunto si hay alguna diferencia entre el estilo de la narrativa y el estilo...
The Truth Is in the Making: Borges and Pragmatism
Jorge Luis Borges's affinities with pragmatism, while certainly no secret to his critics, have rarely been studied before with the intensity and seriousness they otherwise undoubtedly deserve. This fact in and of itself should not come as a surprise;...
Unrequited Sublimations: Borges Reads Spinoza
The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy cites Jorge Luis Borges--along with Wordsworth, Coleridge, Heine, George Eliot, and George Sand, Somerset Maugham, and Bernard Malamud--as creative writers influenced by Baruch Spinoza. The inclusion of Borges...
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