The Romanic Review

A quarterly journal devoted to the study of Romance literatures. Articles cover all periods of French, Italian, and Spanish-language literature. Published by the Department of French and Romance Philology of Columbia University.

Articles from Vol. 105, No. 1-2, January-March

Avant-Propos
This special issue of the Romanic Review gathers texts written in tribute to Philip Watts, who was professor of French in the Department of French and Romance Philology at Columbia University. Phil passed away on Saturday, July 20, 2013, at the tragically...
Camus and Film
Compared with other writers of his generation, Camus had relatively little to say about the movies. Even though he was close to the actress Maria Casares, even though he began working on a screen adaptation of La Princesse de Cleves for Robert Bresson,...
Illusion Lyrique D'un Temoin : Interrogation De Drieu la Rochelle
Engage dans la Collaboration pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale et stigmatise pour cette raison, Pierre Drieu la Rochelle n'en demeure pas moins une figure importante et utile a qui veut comprendre les ecrivains combattants de la Grande Guerre. Son...
Interview with Henry Rousso
Phil Watts and Richard J. Golsan: One of the objectives of our roundtable was to reflect on recent representations of the Second World War, and on works of fiction in particular. To begin, could you comment on this "new phase" in France, regarding...
Interview with Laurent Binet
Phil Watts and Richard J. Golsan: One of the most intriguing aspects of your novel (along with the title, of course) is its blending of genres. HHhH includes an elaborate historical narrative, an adventure story, autobiographical moments, a poetics,...
Literary Attention: The Hairy Politics of Details
What can literary studies bring to our experience? The fact that many scholars, on both sides of the Atlantic, have recently felt the need to address this question is usually interpreted as a symptom of a "crisis" in the literary profession. Fewer...
Philip Watts Editor/edited
In an age when our annual performance reviews invite us to assign metrics to all of our activities--so many student credit-hours taught, so many articles published, so many dollars of grant funding received--some of the most important work we do for...
Phil Watts, Reader of Ranciere
The title given to my remarks in the program, which I've kept here, is a bit misleading, for I am not going to try to situate Phil Watts among the interpreters of Jacques Ranciere. Were I to do that, it might involve my looking at whether Phil's ideas...
Reading Phil Watts on Les Bienveillantes
Last fall I asked Vincent Debaene to share Phil Watts's book proposal, Remnants of Tragedy, with me. The title Remnants of Tragedy had also been the title of Phil's essay on Jonathan Littell's Les Bienveillantes included in the issue of Yale French...
Reading (with) Philip Watts
Quatre des cinq textes qui suivent ont ete prononces le samedi 8 mars 2014, a la Maison Francaise de Columbia University, lors d'une session d'hommages a Phil Watts, qui s'est tenue dans le cadre de la conference annuelle des 20tb and 21st Century...
Remembering Phil
Madeleine and Louise, Sophie, Rich, Elisabeth Ladenson and friends in the Columbia French department, I want to talk to you about Phil, Phil's friendship and collegiality, at a time when words seem useless, our shock and sorrow are so great. Phil...
Remembering World War II in Today's France: Its Precedents and Legacies
In October 2012, Phil Watts organized a roundtable at Columbia University's Maison Francaise devoted to the topic of World War II and its memory today. I was one of three speakers invited. The other two invitees were Henry Rousso, who had charted the...
Roland Barthes, Lecteur De Paul Chack?
Roland Barthes, comme nul ne l'ignore, etait excessivement proche de sa mere. Il vecut toujours aupres d'elle et ne la quittait jamais longtemps (en 1947-1949, quand il partit pour Bucarest, elle l'accompagna, mais elle ne le suivit pas a Alexandrie...
The Poetics and Perils of Faction: Contemporary French Fiction and the Memory of World War II
In an essay published in the summer 2011 special issue of Le Debat entitled "L'Histoire saisie par la fiction," the British historian Anthony Beevor describes and denounces the proliferation in contemporary culture of fictional works he labels "faction."...
The Stakes in Holocaust Representation: On Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds
Despite its unalterable march into past history, the Holocaust remains an object of fascination to contemporary novelists and filmmakers as well as to the public. Along with works that are recognized as enduring masterpieces (Lanzmann's Sboah, David...
"Toute la Misere Du Monde": Eli Lotar's Aubervilliers and a Sense of Place
Paris, the center; the banlieues, the circumference; to these children, this is the whole world. They never venture beyond it. They can no more live out of the atmosphere of Paris than fish can live out of water. For them, nothing exists beyond the...
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