West Virginia University Philological Papers

Articles from Vol. 46, Fall

37[degrees]2 le Matin and Betty Blue: Problems of Film Adaptation
Philippe Djian was unknown, if not ignored, until the success in 1986 of Betty Blue, the movie adaptation of one of his novels. In spite of the fact that he is now one of the best known of a new generation of French writers, full recognition is still...
Anamnesis in "The Dead" and Hiroshima Mon Amour: The Loss of First Loves
In two distinctly different works, the short story "The Dead," by James Joyce, and the filn Hiroshima Mon Amour, the 1959 Alain Resnais adaptation of a screenplay by Marguerite Duras, repressed memory surfaces in the lives of the respective women protagonists,...
A Struggle with Sarah: Fowles, Pinter, Reisz, and the French Lieutenant's Woman
Soon after the publication of The French Lieutenant's Woman, John Fowles invited Harold Pinter to write the screenplay. But it required eleven years to enlist Pinter and director Karel Reisz to agree upon a collaboration. (1) Fowles makes clear that,...
Carne Tremula: An Almodovaresque Screen Adaption
For the first time in his career, Spanish director Pedro Almodovar has made a film based on a novel. Carne tremula, his fourteenth film, is an adaptation of British author Ruth Rendell's Live Flesh. Film adaptations inevitably raise issues of fidelity,...
Dancers without Portfolio: Towards a Theory of Motion in Motion Pictures (*)
My general subject is Kinetics. I'll be talking about everything that moves at the movies: animals, people, machinery. And everything that inscribes, and often embodies, motion: the camera, the editing--the tools of the film-making process. There will...
Eric Rohmer in the '90S: Seasonal Variations on the Conte Moral
J.-F. Marmontel, a popular-eighteenth century writer now largely consigned to oblivion, is credited with the invention of the conte moral, but Eric Rohmer has kept the genre alive. (1) The genre attracted Rohmer from the start; his first commercial...
Film Versions of Hawthorne's "Rappaccini's Daughter"
Nathaniel Hawthorne's "Rappaccini's Daughter" (1844) is among his most anthologized works. Many scholars regard it as his best tale, and it has spawned a bibliography of over a hundred articles. It has also inspired nine musical, seven dramatic, and...
Guadalcanal as Mental State: Narrative Strategy in Terrence Malick's the Thin Red Line
In the same year that Stephen Spielberg's box office hit Saving Private Ryan capitalized upon an end-of-century wave of World War II memoirs, Terrence Malick's 1998 adaptation of James Jones's 1962 novel, The Thin Red Line, was anticipated as a possible...
Keeping Up with the Joans: The Maid of Orleans in Literature and Film
The cult of Joan of Arc has its roots in the political and social upheavals of fin de siecle France, during the same time period when film as a medium is birthed in Lyon by the Lumiere brothers. (1) The events themselves are coincidental, though film...
"Love like There Has Never Been in a Play": Shakespeare in Love as Bardspawn
Is Shakespeare in Love Shakespearean? Does the film that spins out of Marc Norman anD Tom Stoppard's postmodern bricolage succeed merely as a parody of Shakespearean themes (a kind of Young Shakespeare in analogy with Mel Brooks's Young Frankenstein),...
Neither Noir
"Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema," (1) Laura Mulvey's account of how the patriarchal unconscious structures film and its reception, has achieved such a stature in the twenty-five years since its publication that many of its most polemical assertions...
Of Beads and a Crystal Vase: An Exploration of Language into Darkness, of Michael Dorris's the Broken Cord and Cloud Chamber
INTRODUCTION Events take place -- from language into light and from light into darkness. In 1995 Michael Dorris's study of fetal alcohol syndrome, The Broken Cord (1989), was made into a movie for television. It starred Jimmie Smits as Michael Dorris....
Of Carbon Flies, Hieroglyphics, and Body Texts: A Fond Farewell to the Word (*)
The first day of the year 2000 brought a double-issue of Newsweek consisting largely of a collection of previews and predictions entitled "The 21" Century: A User's Guide." 'Where one would normally find the book reviews, an essay provided a time schedule...
Opposition or Identification: Chekhov's Plays on Screen
In the dramatic literature of the last hundred years, the major four plays of Chekhov, The Seagull (1896), Uncle Vanya (1899), The Three Sisters (1901), and The Cherry Orchard (1904), often have been considered difficult to interpret. They have presented...
Shakespeare Boom or Bust?
Are we in the midst of a "Bard Boom," as Newsweek magazine proclaimed in 1999, (1) and, if so, what are the millennial implications for the future of Shakespeare on film? If Hollywood lowers the boom, who, then, owns Shakespeare? The British, who have...
The Black Muse
Though Istvan Szabo's Mephisto has won many awards, including the Oscar for Best Foreign Film in 1981, and has received its share of critical attention, few critics have analyzed closely the role of the black female character in the film. In detailed...