School Arts

School Arts Magazine is an art and craft teaching magazine, used by art, craft and classroom teachers from elementary age to college. It was founded in 1901 and is published nine times a year by Davis Publications Inc.Subjects include education. The editor is Nancy Walkup.

Articles from Vol. 104, No. 6, February

An Ode to Ancestors
About the Fon Peoples The Fon live in the southern part of the People's Republic of Benin. They inhabit an area about the size of Connecticut. To this day, many Fon are farmers. They plant yams, corn, and cotton, and cultivate palm trees that produce...
Art History Now and Then
Back when I was in college (the first time), art history was taught as art in the dark. We looked at slides and memorized dates and artists' names. Most of the artwork represented male artists from the Western World and few connections were made to...
Body Art: Connecting Past and Future
Everywhere you turn, young people are using the human body as a canvas. What they fail to realize is that they are participating in a form of artistic expression that is nearly as old as human existence. Addressing a Need Observing my students'...
Cubistic Patchwork: Middle School
The Art Problem I use Faith Ringgold's artwork to motivate students during Black History Month in February and Women's History Month in March. We discuss the African American women Ringgold brings to life in her story quilts. Guiding Practice...
Culture Boxes: The Art of Retablos
My inspiration for this lesson for my fifth and sixth grade students came from an article on Peruvian-style retablos in the December 1998 issue of SchoolArts. I wanted a multicultural theme for a three-dimensional assignment that incorporated many...
Discovering the Desert
Enduring Ideas America's public lands protect our air and water quality, wilderness and wildlife, and must be conserved for the next generation as part of our national heritage. A hundred years of mismanagement have put our public lands at risk....
Exploring Cultures through Maps
First and second graders can understand that the African continent is made up of many countries and cultures, especially when you have maps, picture books, photographs, and artifacts on hand for them to explore. It's important for young students to...
If It's February, It Must Be Love!
February is so many things. It's Black History Month, it's Presidents' Day, it's the longest, coldest, shortest month of the year! When I taught way up North, February was the month that even the most even-tempered staff would begin to get a little...
Magical Boxes
Students get excited when they realize that they can transform a flat sheet of paper into a box. By using different sizes of paper, they can make different sizes of boxes and put a box inside a box, inside a box. These magical boxes within boxes can...
Now and Then, Here and There
Once again, I want us all to take some time to reflect on our teaching, to consider how we relate to students. We are a nation of many cultures. For the most part, we agree on some aspects of a dominant culture, at least enough so that we can get along...
Sandpainting: A Healing Art
As part of a unit on Native American art studies, students researched Navajo sand painting. In preparation for creating their own sand paintings, they learned that: * the painting process and symbols are an intricate part of Navajo healing ceremonies...
School Environments
It was an overcast and gray afternoon. Stepping over trash, broken liquor bottles, and used syringes, I made my way up to the graffiti-laden door of the city school. I stood at the door and rang the bell--waiting for the standard intercom question...
Tattoo Cool
An excited student who exclaims, "I got a tattoo in art class today!" quickly gathers a following of eager friends who want the same. Each time I start an art lesson with tattoos, the frenzy of fun is predictable, even for staff. I look forward...
Teaching about Traditional African Art
What must we know about African Art? * There are many styles of art in Africa, and they are continually evolving. * Art forms propitiated negative forces and were used in the healing process. * Ancestor figures are not fetishes. They are symbols....
Teaching Art with Music: Collages Inspired by the Art and Music of Romare Bearden
Have you ever thought of using music as a subject for art? When I discovered our third graders studied jazz in music class every February, it seemed an opportune time for me to simultaneously focus on music in art, specifically through the work of...
The Button Project
It started as a dream, a need to educate future generations about the Holocaust, to teach tolerance, and to remember the past. Under the auspices of the Jewish Federation of Peoria, a small band of people joined together with the goal of teaching people...
The Pictorial Quilts of Harriet Powers
My most successful lesson plans have always been those that touch my students in both emotionally and academic ways. The following lesson provided my students with a poignant opportunity for visual expression while also meeting the curriculum requirements...
The Wonder-Full Teacher Project: Peter London and Virginia Freyermuth
Effective art teachers know how important art history is to the formation of a perceptive learner. Notice how our featured Wonder Full Teacher expands the usual chronological introduction to art history. He does this by bringing the learner and the...
Treasures to Remember
A book is a treasure that can hold fascination and wonder within and capture our attention with exterior beauty as well. With this in mind, students explored the rare book covers of the Middle Ages, when books were handwritten by monks on handmade...
Walls of Time: The "Walk through Time" Was Inspired by How Artists of Various Time Periods and Cultures Have Decorated Walls
Last year, we embarked on a school-wide project that would take all of our students, kindergarten through-sixth grade, through a tangible art timeline. The result was a passageway--over seventy-five feet in length--that revealed the history of art,...
What Do You See? Creating a Monoprint
"Is that a lampshade!" someone asked. I stood in front of the class of young students holding a large commercial-sized coffee filter. 18" (46 cm) diameter. "No, it's a coffee filter, and we are going to use it to make a monoprint. A monoprint is a...