The European Journal of Comparative Economics

Articles from Vol. 6, No. 1, June

Comparing China and India: An Introduction
While China and India's average incomes remain low, their sustained economic growth of recent decades combined with their enormous populations (that each exceed the size of the OECD) has turned both countries into such large players that their economic...
Comparing China and India: Is the Dividend of Economic Reforms Polarized?
1. Introduction This is a comparative study of China and India, two of the most populous countries of the world, and which combine to constitute nearly one-third of the world's population. Both India and China have undertaken fairly extensive economic...
Structural Change and Economic Development in China and India
1. Introduction China since 1978 and India since 1992 have passed through a phase of very rapid economic growth accompanied by very important structural changes in the productive systems and severe and largely unresolved social problems. The objective...
The Difficulties of the Chinese and Indian Exchange Rate Regimes
1. Introduction China and India have both attempted distorting the exchange rate in order to foster exports-led growth. This is described as the 'Bretton Woods II' framework, where developing countries buy bonds in the US and keep undervalued exchange...
The Integration of China and India into the World Economy: A Comparison
Introduction The rapid economic rise of China, followed by that of India, has led to a new balance of power in the world economy. Their rise has driven attention to other developing and transition economies which also have a high actual or potential...
The New Comparative Economics versus the Old: Less Is More but Is It Enough?
1. Introduction It is commonly believed that the field of comparative economics entered something of a terminal crisis with the collapse of communism and the socialist economy in the late 1980s. For example, Djankov et al. (2003) write: The...
Vulnerability to Poverty in Select Central Asian Countries
1. Introduction In the extant literature either income or consumption expenditures, as measured over short periods of time (say a year), has been regarded as a proxy for the material well-being of households. However, economists have long recognized...
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