The European Journal of Comparative Economics

Articles from Vol. 6, No. 2, December

Bribes and Business Tax Evasion
1. Introduction Business tax compliance is critical to the fiscal viability of governments. This is particularly true because the bulk of the government's tax revenues, including taxes on profits, VAT and sales taxes, income tax withholding, and...
China and India-A Note on the Influence of Hierarchy vs. Polyarchy on Economic Growth
1. Introduction Communist countries seem to have an advantage in the early stages of development: they seem to be able to shake up their atrophied social structures and mobilize all resources and start upon a fast lane of growth. However, this strategy...
Convergence and Inequality of Income: The Case of Western Balkan Countries
1. Introduction During the Brussels reunion 'Union--Western Balkans' in December 2003, the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the European Union (EU) reaffirmed that the future of the five Balkan countries Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia...
Did China Follow the East Asian Development Model?
Introduction The exceptional economic history of countries such as Japan, Taiwan, (South) Korea and the city-states of Hong Kong and Singapore, has often been put forward as exemplifying a unique and extremely successful East Asian model of development....
Pay Inequality in Turkey in the Neo-Liberal Era, 1980-2001
1. Introduction This paper analyzes pay inequality in the manufacturing sector of Turkey between 1980 and 2001. By doing so, we attempt to sketch a general picture of Turkish income distribution, for the dispersion of manufacturing pay has been...
School-to-Work Transitions in Mongolia
Introduction The aim of this paper is to study the influence of youth education on: a) the accumulation of human capital; 2) and the distribution of incomes. According to UNDP (2006), Mongolia features as one of the 50 poorest countries in the world...
Why Europe? on Comparative Long-Term Growth
1. Introduction In the second half of the 20th century the world was divided into three parts. The First World comprised industrialised Western Europe with its transatlantic offshoots in North America, Australia, and New Zealand with the later addition...
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