Social Work

Social Work is a journal for social workers. It was founded in 1956 and is published quarterly by the National Association of Social Workers.Subjects include sociology.The editor in chief is Jorge Delva.

Articles from Vol. 53, No. 1, January

Acting on Our Values: Do Social Workers Volunteer?
The notion of volunteerism as a key component of civil society has been widely accepted and is consistent with democratic principles and religious precepts (Brooks, 2002; Etzioni, 1994; Salamon, 1999). Herman and Renz (1999) proposed that knowledge...
Development of a Family Intervention for Native Hawaiian Women with Cancer: A Pilot Study
Although cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States (American Cancer Society [ACS], 2004), there have been notable reductions in deaths associated with this disease. In the 1930s, less than 20 percent of cancer patients were living...
Frances Kellor and the Americanization Movement
Social work's current concern with topics such as ethnic sensitive practice, immigration, diversity, and assimilation (de Silva, 2006; Marsh, 2004) marks a rebirth of interest in issues that once dominated the thinking of early social work pioneers...
From Ideological to Competency-Based: The Rebranding and Maintaining of Medical Social Work's Identity
Despite a history rich in patient care, case management, and knowledge-building, medical social work has limped through the past decade. Although there are still the occasional success stories about true heroes who have managed to not only persevere,...
Kin Networks and Poverty among African Americans: Past and Present
Many current public policies and programs that affect poor African Americans place increasing responsibility on families to provide their members with child care, kinship foster care, financial resources, and other types of vital support. The design...
Mental Health in College Athletics: It's Time for Social Work to Get in the Game
The mission of the social work profession is to enhance human well-being and to help meet the basic human needs of all people, with particular attention to empowering people who are vulnerable, oppressed, and living in poverty (NASW, 2000).When thinking...
Moving toward Culturally Competent Practice with Muslims: Modifying Cognitive Therapy with Islamic Tenets
Cultural competence is a fundamental social work value. The NASW Code of Ethics (2000) emphasizes the provision of services that are sensitive to clients' cultures. Similarly, the NASW Standards for Cultural Competence in Social Work Practice (2001)...
Our Nation's Immigrants in Peril: An Urgent Call to Social Workers
Social workers have always been at the forefront of work with immigrants. From our profession's earliest days working with immigrants at the Hull House in Chicago to the current immigration debate, our commitment to social justice has driven both our...
Race and Hospital Diagnoses of Schizophrenia and Mood Disorders
Disparities in mental health services are currently the focus of consumers, providers, policymakers, and researchers (Dougherty, 2004; Snowden, 2003). This attention stems in part from the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health (2003),...
Suicidal Ideation and Attempts among Sexual Minority Youths Receiving Social Services
For almost 20 years, research has documented an increased risk among sexual minority youths for suicidal thoughts and behavior (D'augelli et al., 2005; McDaniel, Purcell, & D'augelli, 2001). Early research, which showed that 21 percent to 42 percent...
The Person-in-Environment Approach: Professional Ideology and Practice of Social Workers in Israel
Person-in-environment is a core concept in social work worldwide (Hare, 2004). Some even claim that this concept, which characterizes social work as a profession that seeks to change and improve the lives of individuals and society and the relationship...
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